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Full text of "...Mirror : Waltham High School"

WALTHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 




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EDUCATION 

1945 



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A Tribute to 
Franklin Delano Roosevelt 



April twelfth, nineteen hundred and forty-five, marked the end of the career 
of a man who had few peers in It is generation. America lost one of her greatest 
patriots, a man who believed in the economic betterment and social improvement 
of his country, a man who was a true friend of democracy. 

Franklin Delano Roosevelt gave the best years of his life to the United 
States. He was one who always did his utmost for the benefit of the common 
man. His passing ends the longest term of office ever held by any president, a 
term filled with greater responsibilities and graver consequences than any 
previous term of office, but one which was successfully managed by a great man. 

President Roosevelt's death presents a challenge to the entire nation to con- 
tinue, as he would wish, the great work which our beloved president so ably 
started. 

The Editor. 




PRO DEUS ET PATRIA 
" — that from these honored dead we take in- 
creased devotion to that cause for which they gave 
the last full measure of devotion; that we here 
highly resolve that these dead shall not have died 
in vain; — " 

Abraham Lincoln 



Vincent Mandile 
John Joseph Furdon 
Arthur James Lazazzero 
George Edward McDonald 
Maxwell D. Stone 
Thomas J. Harron 
S. Barton Eldridge 
Glen F. Allen 
Robert L. Coleman 
Thomas E. Murphy 
Edward F. LaRosee 
William R. Hitchcock 
Lawrence Rogers 
Francis James Powers 
Joseph Madden 



Norman D. Robinson 
Ronald B. Dorrington 
Joseph Campisi 
Charles Gallagher 
Benjamin Jakubik 
John J. Mahoney, Jr. 



Harold Durkin 
Lloyd Wilmont Wade 
Walter Luke 
Francis Kneeland 
Raymond Healion 
Leonard Melanson 
Francis John Joyce 
John Stafford Callahan 
Edward John Recka 
Anselm Belliveau 
Edward Stearns 
Louis Annunciata 
Harry E. Shubley 
Robert D. Baiter 
Robert Allison Lyons 

TRADE SCHOOL 



Roger Wellington 
John A. Ryan 
Warren B. Pratt 
William Stanton 
George E. Contant 
Richard K. Henry 
Robert Collins 
Rosario Rizzo 
Thibault Edmund 
Henry Kelley 
Francis Barnicle 
Merrill Grapes 
William Gorgone 
Bernard Zacame 
Robert Elder 



John F. Maroney 
Raymond P. Shaughnessy 
Christopher Straggas 
Frank J. Savino 
Gerald C. Breen 
Sunda Palumbo 



LTHAM PUBLIC LUtiiMX 
ARCHIVES 



THE MIRROR 

"- to holb as 'twere, tlj* mirror up io Mature" 
Hamlet, Act III, Sc. ii 



Editorial Staff 



Betty Viles 

ALUMNI EDITOR 

Jean Eberhard 

SPORTS EDITORS (BOYS) 

Robert Rier 
Richard Clark 
ART EDITORS 

Barden Wellcome 
Barbara French 
James Davini 

CLASS PHOTOGRAPHERS 

David Law- 
Harold Whitney 
Hector MacLecm 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Richard Clark 

ASSISTANT EDITORS 

Nancy Newcomb 



LITERARY COMMITTEE 



Albert Stiefel 
June Kelley 
Neil Nix 
Eleanor Tomao 
Virginia Oliveri 
Ruth Hagg 
Scott Post 



Janet Turner 

EXCHANGE EDITOR 

Janice Myers 

SPORTS EDITORS (GIRLS') 

Gilda PaJumbo 
Isabel Harpootlian 
MUSIC EDITORS 
Betty Beckett 
Jane Flagg 

GOSSIP EDITOR 

Carolyn Noyes 



HUMOR EDITOR 

Eileen Hatfield 

Joan Morang 
Jean Washburn 
Sherlie Babb 
Charlotte Leavy 
Sylvia Griff 
Betty Hodgdon 



BUSINESS MANAGER 

Alexander Wenckus 



BUSINESS AND 

Amelia Cardillo 
Fay Weuckus 
Lois Coolige 
Effie Bohannon 
Joan Morang 
Miriam Mussinow 
Norma Read 
Eleanor Morreale 
William Frary 
Eleanor Thomas 
Robert Sivewright 
Virginia Johnson 
Farrand Phipps 
Ruth Weagle 



ADVERTISING STAFF 



FACULTY ADVISERS 



Literary Department 
Business Department 
Art Department 



Elaine Lindstrom 
Flora Gray 
Barbara Hooper 
Harry Waterhouse 
Elizabeth Jaclcson 
Marilyn Gowell 
Eleanor Wills 
Jean Eberhard 
Virginia Oliveri 
Adele Waldman 
Sherlie Babb 
John McNamara 
Ann Totora 
Richard Hart 

Miss Viets 
Mr. Hood 
JMrs. Devine 
}Miss Russo 



Arrangement, Make-up and Presswork by the Pupils of the Arthur A. Hansen Trade School Printing 

Shop under the direction of Mr. J. H. Nottenburg 




GEORGE L. WARD 



Dedication 



To MR. WARD, our beloved master, 
who has been an inspiring teacher in all his 
classes, and who will be remembered for the 
great work he has done. 




CHARLES W. GOODRICH, Headmaster 




WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY 

John W. McDevitt, Superintendent of Schools 
Charles W. Goodrich, Headmaster 
George L. Ward, Master 



Alfred T. Hodge, 


Sub-Master 


Lionel M. Mosher, Sub-Master 


Ralph C. Hollis, 


Sub-Master 


Francis E. Sheehy, Sub-Master 


Miriam C. Allen 


Anne C. Graverson 


Almon W. Morang 


Pauline Babb 


Myrtle L. Grover 


Margaret M. Nolan 


Virginia Betts 


Urania B. Hart 


Arthur W. Reynolds 


Evelyn Bliss 


Helen G. Hirst 


Alice N. Rigby 


Walter E. Brinn 


Richard F. Hood 


Constance Russo 


Lilla E. Clement 


Dorothy M. Hyde 


Louise Sewall 


Miriam F. Cunningham 


John L. Leary 


Celia M. Spencer 


Paul F. Curry 


Doris Estabrook Lees 


Dorothy M. Stewart 


Arline B. Darmedy 


George W. Lees 


Ruby E. Viets 


Ethelyn Nolan Devine 


Mary Madden 


Grace L. Woodward 


Thelma L. Eaton 


Dorothy Mankowich 


Marion B. Davis, Clerk 


Lawrence W. Elliott 


Louise G. McCuIlough 


Marie E. Geisler, Clerk 


Harriet I. Flagg 


Ester F. Mehring 


Lorraine Basley, Clerk 


James Garrahan 


Donald B. Mitchell 


Dorothy Minch, School nurse 


Dorothy True Goodwin 


Mary C. Mooney 


{substitute) 



IN THE SERVICE 
Marion E. Frost Edward D. May, Jr. 

Francis M. Curran Thomas A. Roach 

William J. Gallagher George S. Woodman 

Robert W. Power {Substitute) 



Class of 1945 

In the Armed Service 

The following members of the class of 1945 are 
now helping to insure a lasting peace for classes 
graduating after them and are the first to inscribe 
their names on the list of servicemen of the class of 
1945. While we are justly proud of them, it is 
our fervent prayer that Almighty God will see that 
these boys, and the boys to follow, will be returned 
home, quicky, safely, victoriously. 

ARMY 
Weldon Hitchcock John Barrett Manning 

John H. Lowe Stanley Shapiro 

Donald Gordon McLean Robert Wilson Taylor 

NAVY 
Eli Joseph Dion George McElhiney 

Joseph Paul Keefe Harold Ralph Turner 

Robert J. Mara 

MARINES 
Ernest T. Finan Howard Arthur Rockwood 

TRADE SCHOOL 

In the Armed Service 

Paul J. Terestre Salvatore Rizzo 

Raymond S. Demeo Edwin Beach 

John J. Girolamo Charles Manero 

Grover R. Morash Ellis Crossland 

Anthony J. Creonte Louis Castellana 
Gerard H, LeBlanc. 



1 




MR. WARD, Senior Class Adviser 



SENIORS 




J 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Howard Bettinson, Auditor Alexander Wenckus, President 

Barbara Pearson, Vice-President Betty Viles, Secretary-Treasurer 



J 






AHERN. MARGARET TERESA 

Stenographic Course 

Peggy's only desire is to be a suc- 
cess in life-- ".Gee Whiz'' she ex- 
claims when something arouses her 
curiosity. She likes practically 

everything including dancing, eating. 
and sleeping. People who tall 
much, and fellows who croon in her 
ear while dancing simply make her 
blood boil. 

Honoi Roll II. 



ALESSE. ANGELINA RITA 
business Machines Course 
"Arc you Foolish?" says Angelina. 

Here is a gnl who liki 
and dancing, and also Hob Hope and 
F. Sinatra. She aims to be a 
cess in the business world, an 
thing for such a conscientious pc 
Honor Roll II. 





•\I ISEO, MIMI JOSEPHINE 

Accounting Course 
South America, here I . ome!" 
Wonder il they have butter cotch 
sundaes in those p.irts. doubtlessly 
there is an abundance of ban I 
Muni is one ol our siar basketball 
players, a member il die cvet .iitr&s- 
iul senior tills 'i-.-jin. 

Honor Roll III 

Basketball and Volleyball. 



AIM RISIO, ( ARMI I A 

Clerical Couise 

When you hear ii/. anv- 

how!" sounding through the ■ 
dors, it's probably ( arm* la wh 
discovered one of her chief dish 
runs in her silk stockings, or girls 
with superior aiis. Always on tmu 
she enjoys roller-skating, bowling, 
anil horseback ruling. pins 

either to continue her business stud/ 
or to take an art course. 





ANDREWS, ROBERT STANLEY 

( ollege Prep.il itory Course 
Bob'' is very sarcastic, but he 
more than makes up for this fault 
with his honesty and generosity. He- 
has the interesting hobby of collecting 
other people's jewelry. He likes 

sports, debates, Mr. Morang's humor, 
and — excitement, which he should 
plenty of if he (ultills his ambition 
to become an investigator for the Fed- 
eral Government. 

Honor Roll IV 



ANNIS, RUSSELL IMVII) 
nographic ( oui 

lust let me remain in bed „n.| 
Catch up on lost sleep. s.i>s Uuss, 
who tries to be as jolly as p.; 
and to make others the same. Pop- 
ular songs and modern music ..'e Ins 
favorites, while classical music and 
dry movies are some-thin 
ed. 

Honor Roll. 





ARRIGO, MARY I 

Business Accounting Course- 
Being sweet and on time are two of 
Mary's virtues, so she should base 
little trouble realizing her ambition 
of working in a bank. She likes to 
receive letters from a certain sailor, 
and to dance when he is at home. 



AUCOIN, JOHN 
Trade School 





AUCOIN. LUBIN PATRICK 

Practical Arts Course 

Luby's very popular, for he's al- 
ways lending money. This will be 
good business training for him, be- 
cause, after Luby finishes his term in 
the Navy, he plans to buy a restau- 
rant, where every bit of business 
ability is needed. Luby, however, 
has plenty of that ability. 



BARBANTI, BLANCHE T. 

Accounting Course 

Blanche, in spite of all that red 
hair is very patient and seldom Hies 
off the handle. She is one of our best 
bowlers although any idea of "real 
work" is repelling. Eating takes up 
her spare time — maybe that s why she 
often asks, "What's cookin'?" 

Honor Roll II, III. 

Bowling III, IV; Volley Ball IN. 



RARTLETT, NATHAN ALFRED 

Practical Arts Course 

Nathan wants to be a radio techni- 
cian in the Navy and after the v, it a 
photo-engraver. He is an ardent 
Crosby tan and so naturally dislikes 
"Frankie." Hunting in the back 

woods of Lincoln is one of his parti- 
cular sports. 

Honor Roll III, IV. 



BECKETT, ELIZABETH BERNICE 

Technical Course 

We shall always remember Betty, 
the energetic little senior who ltd 
the singing at junior and Senior as- 
semblies. Vve wish her success when 
she attends Boston University ncu 
year. 

Aionor Roll II, III, IV. 

Music Editor of Mirror. 

Usher at 44 graduation. 





BENINATI, ALFRED FRANCIS 

Practical Arts Course 

Dick's future includes time in the 
U. S. Navy. "Do you eat the bird?" 
is his pet expression. He is proud of 
having all his work done on time. 
Music, girls, and eating take up all 
of his spare time. He dislikes gills 
that are teasers — so take the hint. 



BERRY, MARION ELLA 

Accounting Course 

One never has to wait for this 
"gal" — who is always on time. While 
she thoroughly enjo,s the movies and 
hockey games, she wonders whether 
her Dad will ever get paid bacK in 
any of these investments. 





DETT'NSON, HOWARD EDWIN 

Stenographic Course 

Whenever anyone voices his dislike 
for Frank Sinatra, Howie always 
says, "You can say that again!" He 
enjoys watching the movies, espe- 
cially Betty Hutton. We know 
Howie's good nature and promptness 
will help him make a success in the 
Navy. 

Senior Class Auditor. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 

Band I, II. 

Junior Prom Committee. 

Worth Junior Alumni Committee. 

Sophomore Social Committee. 



BOHANNON, EFFIE MAY 

College Course 

This busy and popular senior has 
no present ambition, but whatever sue 
does, we know she will do it well. 
May you always be as popular as >ou 
were in high school, Erne. 

President of Freshman Class. 

Dramatic Club. 

Advertising Staff of Mirror. 

Basketball II. 




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BOWLER, EDWARD WILLIAM 

Practical Arts Course 

Eddie, like so many of our other 
classmates, is Navy bound. A driving 
center on our fighting football team, 
his Irish spirit saved many a game 
for Waltham. Contemptuous of 

any whose spirit is not equal to his 
own, he backed it up with real sports- 
manship. 

Football II, III, IV. 



BOWMAN, HAROLD MINOT 

Accounting Course 

Harry is that good-looking blond 
you always see dashing down the cor- 
ridors, usually to ask Leafy how to 
make fancy side shots, his destina- 
tion is some part of the service, where 
he is sure to make himself one of 
the most popular fellows. 

Senior Nominating Committee. 

Basketball IV. 





BOYD, JR., CHARLES EDWARD 

Business Clerical Course 

We shall soon find Charles in the 
Navy, if his wish is granted. Know- 
ing Charles, we are sure he will be a 
success and we wish him good-luck. 



BRADEY, PAUL JOSEPH 

Practical Arts Course 

Paul likes sports and all types of 
girls. Lending money to Tasker is 
one of his many good points. He as- 
pires to go to Hollywood and be- 
come a farmer (? ? ? — whoever heard 
of becoming a farmer in Hollywood?) 







BRYSON, MARGARET THELMA 

Practical Arts Course 

Peggy is one of the partners in Ibe 
tea-room to be owned and operated 
by Peggy and Kattie, Inc. She and 
Kattie are friends who will surely 
make a success. Peggy says she is 
always on time. Waiting for peo- 

f>le and showers in gym are her ois- 
ikes. 



BULLOCK, SHIRLEY MARCIA 

Stenographic Course 

lees ambition is to become a medi- 
cal secretary. She likes listening to 
music, especially when it's Bing 
Crosby's or Glenn Miller's. Lee dis- 
likes getting up early in the morn:ng 
and people who say, "Are you kid- 
ding/'' 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 





BURTON. BARBARA CARRIE 

Practical Arts Course 

Barbara enjoys figuring out puzzles, 
a task at which she is usually unsuc- 
cessful. She also likes attending the 
movies with the girls and get'ne up 
at noon on Saturday, but not waiting 
in the cafeteria line and waiting for 
letters from a sailor. 



CALUSDIAN, BEATRICE H. 

Business Machines Course 

Here's a girl with a unique ambi- 
tion, a desire to go to Cuba. After 
the winter we've just passed, who 
can blame her? Beatrice is also an 
avid food consumer and loves all 
types. She also likes to make friends 
and keep them, which is easy for her. 





CALUSDIAN, ELIZABETH 

( A THER1NE 

Accounting Co_urse 

Liz takes a great interest in col- 
lecting records of band leaders, and 
likes to listen to them by the hour. 
Artie Shaw is her favorite. She 
plans to travel around the world like 
so many of her other classmates 
Mondays in school are her pet dislike. 



CAMPBELL, LILLIAN GERIRIDI 

Teachers' College ( oursc 

When "Lill" goes in training at 
the Newton Hospital she will be a 
welcome addition to its stafl 
looking nurses. She'd better not 
shout, "Hey, you know what?", in 
the quiet corridors, but of course she 
won't as long as her calm mannci 
dominates her genial personality 
admits that weakness of hers lor 
chocolate walnut sundaes, but we 
can't blame her for that, can we? 





CANTWELL. MARION BERNICE 

Stenographic Course 

"Mapsie" enjoys square dances, 
English in 015, and summer vacation 
in Canada. "Well, you crumb, 

you!" is her favorite expression. She 
is noted for answering letters 
promptly. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 



CASELLA. THERESA JOANNE 
College Preparatory Course 
Theresa dislikes people who are al- 
ways late, although she is usually 
late herself, but she enjoys stormy 
weather. She is loyal, friendly, and, 
best of all, she laughs at everybody's 
jokes. She is planning to train at 
Massachusetts General Hospital and 
eventually to become a Navy nurse. 
Luck, "Tee," you'll make a grand 
nurse. 

Honor Roll II. Ill, IV. 
Bowling III. IV. 
Basketball II. 




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CASEY, JEANNE KATHRYN 

Business Machines Course 

Jeanne is a popular member of the 
local talent circle which presents 
many entertaining shows for the ser- 
vicemen under the U. S. O. Getting 
along with people is her best virtue. 
and she can't understand why some 
people can be conceited 

Dramatic Club II, III. 



CASWELL. DONALD RICHARD 

Stenographic Course 

Don, who is often heard saving 
"Are you kidding?" plans to join 
the Navy. As there is a war on, his 
other ambition, to become a photog- 
rapher, will have to wait. Don en- 
joys photography and following all 
the sports. No dislikes and prompt- 
ness are two factors which will help 
him become a success. 



CASWELL, RICHARD ALBERT 

Technical Course 

All that Dick can say when he sees 
a beautiful blonde or a shapely bru- 
nette is "What can you do?" He 
intends to make money by means of a 
printing press, now that he's finished 
printing gas coupons. His good na- 
ture and ready smile disappear when 
he has to push balking cars or arise 
early in the morning. Dick's final 
advice to his classmates is "Take it 
slow." 



CHAGNON MICHAEL JOSEPH 

Clerical Course 

Mike would like very much to keep 
out of trouble with his teachers. 
Bringing notes on time helps placate 
them, but doesn't cure all. Mike 
likes to dance and takes an interest 
in all sports. 




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CHIASSON, MARGARET 

Clerical Course 

Margaret is the girl whose favorite 
expressions are "Listen, Bud" or 
"Golly Geepers." She likes bowling 
and ice-skating and has no use for 
conceited people. Her modest aspira- 
tion is only to be a good typist. 

Senio/ Nominating IV. 



CHIASSON, DORIS MAY 

Practical Arts Course 

Doris will do anything to help 
anyone, if she can. This explains 
the reason for the popularity of this 
good-natured senior. Cowboy songs 
and playing the guitar are the interests 
of this western-minded girl, who 
hopes some day to be able to travel out 
west or to become a telephone op- 
erator. 





CHRISTIANSEN, RUTH MARIE 

Stenographic Course 

Ruth is one girl in our class who 
likes to eat and to excel in sports. 
She doesn't like being called "Rita," 
and she dislikes the Roberts bus. 
Her goal is Boston University, Col- 
lege of Practical Arts and letters. 
Best of luck to you, Ruthie. 

Cheer Leader. 

Bowling 

Baseball. 

Basketball. 

Volley Ball. 

Dramatic Club. 

Football Usher 

Class Day Usher. 



CINCOTTA. ROLAND JOHN 

Business Machines Course 

Whenever a group of girls get to- 
gether and Ronnie passes By, you will 
always hear sighs of "Isn't he cute!" 
Ronnie should worry; this always 
smiling lad will make friends where - 
ever he goes. He also likes to step 
out whenever possible, and to listen 
to Bob Hope when he's at home. 



CHUTE, EDWARD H. 

Clerical Course 

Eddie plans to become a cattle 
rancher after graduating from Wal- 
tham High. He has the business 
ability to do such work, as witnessed 
by the fact that his conduct is ex- 
cellent and his homework is invar- 
iably completed. 



CINCOTTA, ROSE MARIE 
College Preparatory Course 
Rose is a good person to have 
around as she has that charming vir- 
tue of being agreeable. She dislikes 
conceited people and washing dishes, 
but she enjoys dancing with her big 
brother. Next year she is planning to 
go to Boston University. Loads of 
luck. Rose ! 

Honor Roll II. III. 







CLARK, HAROLD JAMES 
College Preparatory Course 
Big, bashful "Hal" says that his 
worst fault is trying to understand 
women. He likes the South Side, 
dreamy music, Mr. Ward, the out-of- 
doors, and sports — especially football — 
and he dislikes silly girls, radio com- 
mercials, and cafeteria lines. There is 
no doubt but that his wish to become 
a successful man will come true. 
Senior Dance Committee. 
Junior Prom Committee. 
Football III. IV. 



CLARK, HELEN M. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Honest to Pete" and "Good 
Heavens" cries "Honey" as she darts 
through the corridors and cafeteria. 
She admits she is too noisy, but her 
good disposition balances that. She dis- 
likes people who make scandal for her, 
and hearing "There Goes That Song 
Again." Honey's greatest concern right 
now is that her daddy may come back 
safe, and soon. 








CLARK. RICHARD Y. 

Technical Course 

CUver, modest, studious, conscien- 
tious— that's Dick, genius of the Tech 
class. When he's not working or 
studying, you probably will find him 
enjoying hit interesting hobby, motion 
picture photography. He admires Mr. 
Ward and Miss Spenser, and his 
favorite subjects are mathematics and 
physics. Next year he hopes to attend 
Rensselaer Polytechnical and after that 
— well the future should hold great 
things for Dick ! 

Chairman, Junior Prom Committee; 
Honor Roll II, III. IV; Editor of 
"Mirror" IV. 



CLARKE. DONALD S. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Salvy" hopes some day to become 
a cowboy and frequently says at op- 
portune moments. Hey. get on it!" 
For some reason he has a particular 
dislike for Curve Street, and P. J's 
girls. He plays golf and finds it a 
great sport. As for bands, the Hoo 
sier Hotshots get "Dons" rote. 





COMEAU WALTER PHILIP 

Practical Arts Course 

"Wally" is always lending money 
when he has it, but still has enough 
left over to enjoy dancing and all 
types of sports. He is a member of 
the Air Corps Reserve and hopes to 
leave this summer for the Army Air 
Corps. Good luck, Wally! 

Sophomore Nominating Committee ; 
Football III; Junior Prom Committee. 



CONNORS. MARY ALICE 

Practical Arts Course 

Modest Mary hopes to travel so much 
that Mrs. Roosevelt will become en- 
vious. (That much travel just ain't). 
She plans to become a dental hygienist. 

Dramatic Club. 





CORMIER. PAULINE LAUDIA 
College Preparatory Course 



Sparkling brown eyes, a mischievous 

'psr' 

Dancing at 'Tote' 



smile, plenty 

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-that s 
Penny!" Dancing at ''Tote" and 
telephone conversations every night 
with "Bill" are her top likes. Penny's 
energetic, good-natured way should 
make her future a very happy one. 

"Mirror" Room Agent II. Ill, IV; 
Dramatic Club. 



COUSINS. MARLYN LORRAINE 

Stenographic Course 

Lorraine would like to develop her 
musical talents and become a singer. 
She has made a grand beginning by 
attending choir rehearsals every week. 
She likes sports and music but dislikes 
bookkeeping and (please take notice. 
Neil) boys that tease. 

Bowling II. III. IV; Honor Roll II. 
III. 





CRONIN. BETTY ANN 

Practical Arts Course 

Betty has the right slant on life, 
"Laugh and the world laughs with 
you." No wonder this smiling lass 
is liked by so many. Teasing Demarais 
and eating at a certain coffee shop are 
great fun. Betsy admits she has a 
weakness for forgetting names but 
makes up for it by smiling. 

Dramatic Club IV. 



CROSSLAND. ELLIS D. 
Trade School 




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CURTIN. RITA PAULINE 

Stenographic Course 

A future student at Boston Univer- 
sity, "Ree" is almost always seen with 
Ruthie. One of those "wildcats" from 
Roberts, she firmly believes in its fu- 
ture civilization. She is usually seen 
weekends dancing at the Totem Pole. 

Football Usher II. III. IV; Bowling 
II. III. 



DEACON, LOIS RIDGEWAY 

Stenographic Course 

"Deac" wants to attend Business 
College and then to travel. Every 
morning she greets her pals with, 
"What s new?" J. H.'s sandwiches 
in shorthand classes and Mr. H's 
apples kill Lois's appetite for any 
lunch, where there are no milk shakes. 
Homework and beano are Lois's dis- 
likes. She hopes that some day she'll 
arrive on time for a bus. 



DELANEY, ANNE ROSE 

Stenographic Course 

Annie likes roller skati.-.g and ice- 
skating, and collecting pi. id, .3 oi' 
friends and cowboy iecj;ds. She 
would like to go to Canada after 
graduation and settle down there in an 
office. The United States will lose a 
good citizen if Annie carries out her 
plan. 

Honor Roll II, III. 



DELLA CAMERA, DA EDITH 

Stenographic Course 

Ida wants to travel around the 
world. When somejhi.ig amazes her 
she exclaims, "Are you lidding.'' Her 
best virtues are bei.ig accommodating 
and keeping her teim.'U, especially 
where N. F. is concerned. She dis- 
liKes hypocntical and conceited piop.e. 
Ida likes to read, to travel, and to 
hear music of all kinds. 





LF.LLEPIGNE, YOLANDA MARIE 

Business Machines Course 

Lana claims that . c he is never on 
time, I ut this is more than compen- 
sated for by her smiling disposition. 
I. ana likes sports and collecting jewelr ■ 
pins, especially ones with pictures of 
horses. As for her ambition, she is 
sure to make a success as a model or 
globe-trotter. 

Bowling II, Class Day Usher. 



DEMARAIS, ARLENE DANIELLE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Hey, Barbara, wait fot me," sa,s 
Arlene as s.ie calls out to Barbaia \.hj 
is nervously stamping her feet. The e 
two are inseparable friends. Both have 
the same likes and dislikes so tl.e 
combination is natural. 

Dramatic Club IV. 





DERMOTT, JEAN DELCRUS 

Stenographic Course 

Dixie hopes to get married and have 
that white bungalow with B. R. 
"How's it goin'?" is Jean's favorite 
expression. Jean gets along with ever - 
one. Our Merchant Marine, chocolate 
cake, and pay day rate high on her 
list. Conceited people, liver, and 
mo idy fellows are her dislikes. 

Sop u omore Social Committee; Honor 
Roll II. 



DEVEAUX, GEORGE DAVID 

Technical Course 

When George sees "Yammie" ap- 
proaching him, he just hides hh potato 
chips and says, "No chips this time, 
"Yammie'." George, who intends to 
see the world from an airplane, likes 
sports particularly, but, when it come;, 
to rolid geometry, all he sa.s is that 
it gives him a solid headache. 

Baseball III, IV; IV B Club; Foot- 
ball IV. 





DI LORENZO, SUSAN MARY 

Stenographic Course 

Sue is a Sinatra fan, and collects 
pictures of Frankie for her scrapbook. 
She drlikes tests and Monday morn- 
ings, and also doing El's homework, 
a task which she does very well. Sue 
hopes to make a success in whatever 
she does, and with a grand start in 
the right direction, she should have- 
very little trouble. 



DI MURRO, MARIE A. 

Stenographic Course 

Marie is another popular senior. 
This jovial lass is well known for her 
musical talent and has entertained us 
many times with perfectly executed 
selections on her accordion. Her desire 
is to make a name for herself in the 
field of music, and, of course, for a 
girl like her the wish is a "cinch" to 
come true. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV; Bowling; 
Dramatic Club. 





DION. ELI IOSEPH 

Pracictal Arts Course 

"Shorty" hopes to stay in the Nav 1 
and run his own ship around th" 
world. "Hi, va kid" is "Shorty's" prt 
saying. He is always on time, but is 
very bashful. He likes to listen to 
Bing Crosby and to argue with L. A. 
He dislikes neckties a^d girls who wear 
too much make-up. People who don't 
mind their own business irritate him 

Baseball II, III; Nominating Com- 
mittee II. 



DI PRONIO, MARY A. 

Teachers' College Course 

Mary has a jolly time teasing Gib- 
ley, her schoolmate and chum. It's all 
done in fun, for Mary's jolly disposi- 
tion just naturally causes her to create 
fun. She's a girl who wishes everyone 
well, and we all wish her well on her 
career as a teacher. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. " 









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DORVAL, ELSIE ELIZABETH 

Stenographic Course. 

"Gosh! you can say that again" is 
Elsie's favorite expression. She wishes 
to become either a nurse or an aviatrix 
and likes collecting snapshots and 
records, flying, and taking part in all 
sports. One thing she can t stand is 
a poor sport. 

Basketball; Badminton; Volley-ball; 
Archery; Baseball; Honor Roll II, III. 



DOUCET. RUSSELL ALBERT 

Practical Arts Course 

"What do ya say?" asks Russ, 
waiting impatiently for his buddies, 
and he has good cause for complaint as 
he is never late for dates. He likes 

fopular music and Sinatra, and would 
ike to be able to emulate the "Great 
Crooner." 

Dramatic Club, IV. 





DUGAN, DONALD NORMAN 

Business Machines Course 

"Buster"' aspires to stay in Waltham 
and become president of the Waltham 
Watch Company. If he does he will 
have no reason for being late, which 
he claims is his worst fault. Donald 
is also quite a skating fan, and likes 
to go skating in Newton with the 
fellows, including Will and Betty. 



DUGAS. ESTHER MARY 

Business Machines Course 

We have seen Esther often as she 
atemptcd to usher us to scats during 
the football season. With her ex- 
cellent drawing ability she will re the 
successful artist she hopes to be, well 
patronized by her manv friends. 

Dramatic Club II, III. 





DUNN. BARBARA ANNE 

Practical Arts Course 

Barbara's ambition is to join the 
Cadet Nurse Corps. Writing up 'lab' 
experiments and taking showers at 
the last bell seems to her annoying, 
but she likes writing to a certain 
sailor — J. H. — and her afternoons in 
the coffee shop. 

Dramatic Club III. 



ELANDER, JOHN ROBERT JR. 

Accounting Course 

Johnny admits he has a quick tem- 
per, but then adds that he gets over 
it lust as quickly. Johnny also has a 
good time wherever he goes, especially 
when he is with a certain 5' 7". He 
hopes to become a cook in the Navy, 
so that he'll be prepared in case he 
marries someone who can't cook (good 
philosophy) . 





FALZONE, CHARLES WILLIAM 

Pactical Arts Course 

"Chuck" likes scft music, girls, 
Frank Sinatra, and Alan Ladd, but 
any girl who plays "hard-to-get" is 
definitely "uh-uh" with him. Chuck's 
industry will stand him in good stead 
when he takes over his own grocery 
store. 

Red Cross Committee ; Dramatic- 
Club. 



FARRELL. BARBARA MARY 

Stenographic Course 

Barb, who takes pride in being on 
time, intends to become a private 
secretary. "Happy day!" or "You ain't 
kidding!" are some of her pet sayings. 
Barb enjoys skating and square dances. 

Honor Roll I. II, III. 





FARRELL, RAYMOND JOHN 

Accounting Course 

Red's famous for putting up with 
Paul, Bob, and Leafy. He is a football 
advocate, being on the team for two 
years. His destination is the United 
States Navy, preferably the submarine 
division. Red's friendly character will 
mate him one of the best liked fel- 
lows on the boat. 

Football III. IV; Honor Roll II, 
III. IV. 



FENELEY, JAMES SINCLAIR, JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

Jim's ambition is to join the U. S. 
Marines. If you hear someone saying, 
"Eat it. It's ice cream!" you can be 
sure it's Jim. As for virtues, Jim 
claims that he does not sing in Mr. 
Elliot's classes. Coffee frappes and 
chicken dinners are tops with him, but 
stuck up girls and neckties he dislikes. 
Belmont is a beautiful place — isn't it, 
Jim? 

Senior Dance Committee. 



FERRERA, ANTOINETTE MARIE 

Business Machines Course 

"Toni" collects money and sou- 
venirs from different countries for an 
interesting hobby. She also desires to 
travel, preferably in her own car. Danc- 
ing, bowling, Bob Hope, and evenings 
with fried clams and pickles she likes, 
but not conceited girls. 



FINAN, ERNEST T., JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

He's that "hefty" senior who has 
played Right End on our football team 
for the past two years. Now a mem- 
ber of the fighting Marines, he is 
still on a championship team. He will 
be remembered for all those wonderful 
tackles made at just the right moment. 
After the war, Ern will be found 
deep in the woods of Maine, just 
fishing all day. 

Football I, II, III. 





FITZGERALD, PATRICK DAVID 

Practical Arts Course 

"Fitzie's" "Hi, how's it going?" 
adds new joy to his hearers. A civil 
service position is his ambition. After 
earning enough to retire, Fitzie just 
wants to rest and rest forever ! He 
likes snorts of all kinds, the newest 
movies, and a good time, but dislikes 
girls that talk too much. 

Football I, II, III ; Captain of the 
Medford game. 



FOOTE, EVELYN HELEN 

Business Machines Course 

Evelyn wants to move and settle in 
sunny California after the war. After 
last winter, who can blame her? 
Making friends and keeping them is 
one of her many virtues. She likes cats 
and friendly people, but not conceited 
people. 





FOOTE, LAURENCE EDWARD 

Practical Arts Course 

Larry is our nomination for the 
"angel" of Room 114. His claim to 
this .title can be based on the fact 
that he never fails to stay after school 
for Miss Allen, a virtue in any man's 
language. Larry has his eyes on the 
Navy, but would like to become a 
musician after the war. 



FRENCH, BARBARA WINSLOW 

College Course 

"I'm sorry," "Oh that's silly!" or 
"Don't look at me like that" replies 
"Barbie" as she chats with her friends 
in the corridor. Her ambition is to 
meet Bing Crosby. "Barbie" prides 
herself on being a good "sister" to 
George and always being cheerful. 
She likes Mr. Hodge's apples, long 
walks, and "Stardust," but dislikes 
waiting for Sue and chem. tests. 

Art Editor of "Mirror" IV. 







FRENCH, ESTELLE CURTIS 

Practical Arts Course 

Estelle wants to marry, and her fu- 
ture spouse must plan on a world trip, 
although he should certainly steer clear 
of any cold regions to which Estelle 
is allergic. Life will never be dull for 
this lively little miss ! 

Honor roll II, III. 



FURDON, WILLIAM EDWARD 

Practical Arts Course 

When questioned on why he wasn't 
on time, Big Bill just says, "Better late 
than never." He likes sports and 
drinking cokes in Joe's. His ambition 
is to become a professional football 
player and we know he will be suc- 
cessful. 

Football II, III, IV; Basketball II, 
IV; Baseball II. 





GALINAUSKI, ALBERTA V. 

Stenographic Course 

Al says she is different. Could it 
be that it is because she is patient with 
Izzy? Anyway, Al likes listening to 
the radio, writing letters, and reading 
in bed. Her future hope is to become 
a model, a job for which she is well 
suited. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV; Class Day 
Usher. 



GARDINER, GEORGE HENRY 

Business Machines Course 

Tests in physics and salted peanuts 
are "Peck's" dislikes, while a good 
movie puts him in the right spirit. He 
never forgets to bring notes for ab- 
sences, a fact which explains the ardent 
admiration his teachers have for him. 








GAUDET. ELIZABETH ANN 

Accounting Course 

Betty plans to make a success in 
business life before she settles down 
and is married. Her honesty and 
loyalty will assure her of success, while 
her shyness and sweetness will surely 
make her married life happy. 



GEISLER, G. JUNE 

Stenographic Course 

June's ambition is to be a secretary 
and also to see a certain fellow arrive 
on time. Any time during the day one- 
is apt to hear, "Kelle-y! Wait for me!" 
June's pet expression. She is always 
willing to help people and enjoys 
dancing with A. W., collecting bangles, 
hearing semi-classical music, and 
drinking frappes. Homework and lazy 
people are her chief dislikes. 

Honor Roll I, II, III; Senior Dance 
Committee. 





GEOFFRION, BARBARA ESTELLA 

Practical Arts Course 

"Oh, don't be facetious," says 
Barb, probably at anyone who doesn't 
like Mr. Morang, her chemistry 
teacher. This blond young lass likes 
to sleep late on Saturday mornings and 
to listen to Bing Crosby. She hopes 
to make things go right so that she- 
can take a trip around the world. 



GI RRITSON, EDWARD HERBERT 

Practical Arts C ourse 

Eddie is one of the brightest students 
of Room 114. He explains this by 
saying he never feels sleepy because he 
catches up on lost sleep in a certain 
room on the second floor, east wing, 
thereby being wide awake at all times. 
He would like to visit Tokyo by air, 
but we hope that there won't be any- 
thing left of the place by the time 
Eddie flies over. 

Band II, III, IV. 





GESNER. CHARLENE MARGUERITE 

College Course 

Never keep Charlie waiting or you 
just will be left out in the cold. One 
can't blame her; she hasn't time to 
waste when Barb and a certain blond 
sailor are waiting at Doe's. Charlcne 
plays the piano for the entertainment 
of others, and her sunny disposition 
will be a great asset to her. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV; Dramatic 
Club. 



GIARDINA. ROSE MARY 
College Preparatory Course 
Rose likes her job in homeroom of 
rcferceing when Betty and Bob argue, 
although she dislikes being kept after 
school for talking when she tn< 
settle these arguments. She hop 
become a teacher after graduating from 
college. Her smile should make her 
a very friendly one. 

Honor Roll II. III. IV; Dramatic 
Club. 





GIBBS, MYRTLE R. 

Business Machines Course 

Gibby likes going out with Ruthie 
or going to the Central with R. G. 
She doesn't like getting up in the 
morning or doing homework, for which 
nobody can blame her. If one is 
looking for a good secretary, the 
search ends here. 



GIBSON, CORINNE 

Teachers' College Course 

By "Gibby's" pet saying, "Prove 
it," you'dthink that she wanted to be 
a lawyer, but no, she aspires to become 
a cadet nurse. (This training will 
come in handy, too, if she indulges 
too heavily in her favorite pastime, 
eating hot fudge sundaes.) She likes 
to tease "Dippy" and also holds no 
little affection for the U. S. Navy. 
(I wonder who he is.) 

Dramatic Club IV ; Usher at Parent- 
Teachers; Honor Roll I, IV. 





GIMMINARDA, ROSE ANN 

Business Machines Course 

Rose is one of those few people who 
like classical music and dislike jitter- 
bugging, but otherwise she is con- 
sidered normal. Of course, we're 
joking, because we know she will 
make a successful secretarv as she 
hopes to do. Once financially settled. 
Rose wants to tour the United States. 



GONSALVES, PETER JOSEPH 

Accounting Course 

"Pete" wants to become a business 
executive, and his sociability and 
personality will help him gain his 
ends. His favorite expression is "Ain't 
that sweet." His favorite sports are 
hockey, baseball, and boxing. 



GORDON, PAUL UNDERWOOD 

Practical Arts Course 

"Flash" will go all over creation to 
secure a "Boogie-woogie record." The 
Maritime Cadet School, however, is his 
destination, where he intends to apply 
for radio training and possibly to get 
on the same ship as his older brother. 
Afterwards, Paul will make a success 
as a designer. 



GOULD, RENNE ELLEN 

College Preparatory Course 

Although she is "still a mouse," 
Renne has a good-natured smile for 
everyone. "Is there any mail today?" 
is the first thing she asks when she 
goes home and most likely it's a letter 
from D. K. that _ she's expecting. 
Whatever she does in the future, her 
pleasing nature is certain to make her 
successful. 

Honor Roll II ; Bowling ; Dramatic 
Club. 





GRIFF, BARBARA Z. 

Stenographic Course 

One usually hears Babs say, "Whats 
cookin'?" or "Are you kidding?" To 
be a medical secretary is her ambition. 
Babs is noted for her good naturedness 
and her ready smile. 

Bowling I, III ; Dramatic Club ; 
Honor Roll I. 



GRIFF, SYLVIA LILLIAN 

Stenographic Course 

"Syl's" ambition is to be a private 
secretary. "Seeing is believing" or 
"What's new today kids!" are "Syl's" 
most treasured expressions. She is 
always willing to help anyone in 
trouble and possess the power to keep 
her temper when arguing with Marie 
and Rennie. Her spare time is spent 
in collecting classical records, danc- 
ing, and eating Hot Fudge Sundaees. 

Bowling I, II, III; Honor Roll I. 





GUBA, ROBERT F. 

Technical Course 

"Bob" will either join the navy or 
go to college ; at present, he would 
like to see a change in the cafeteria 
system. When asked if he likes week- 
end homework, he will reply, "Are 
you kiddin'?" He likes areonautics, 
sports, and playing in the Band. Gen- 
tlemanly conduct gives him many 
friends. 

Band I, II, III, IV; Assistant editor 
of the "Mirror"; Vice-President of 
homework exchange of IVB Club. 



HAMWEY, ALAN GEORGE 

Practical Arts Course 

The Marine Corps will probably 
claim Alan this summer. After his 
stretch, he would like to make things 
go right so that he could own his own 
business. We all hope he's successful 
in both enterprises. 

Dramatic Club III; Basketball II, 
III. 





HANSEN, ELIOTT GEORGE 

Pracictal Arts Course 

Eliott is that handsome young man 
whom everybody knows and likes. Be- 
ing reserved and keeping out of 
trouble has only enhanced his popu- 
larity and the respect people have 
for him. He is also known for his 
great playing as a member of the 
football team. The armed services will 
claim officer-material when Eliott en- 
lists. 

Sophomore Nominating Committee ; 
Junior Prom Committee ; Senior Dance 
Committee ; Football IV ; Honor Roll 
II. 



HAPENNY, BARBARA MARIE 

Stenographic Course 

Barbara enjoys meeting people and 
taking part in all sports, but getting 
up early and bossy peoples are two 
of her dislikes. She would like to be 
a successful secretary, which shouldn't 
it be impossible for such a talented 
girl. 

Sophomore Nominating Committee. 





HARPOOTLIAN, ISABEL H. 

Stenographic Course 

Isabel, better known as "Izzy," al- 
ways greets everyone with a smile. 
Her ambition is to become an effi- 
cient, private secretary. Flash that 
smile often, "Izzy," and we know 
you will succeed ! 

"Mirror" Staff. 

Sophomore Nominating Committee. 

Honor Roll I, II, III. 

Volley Ball 

Basketball. 

Bowling 

Baseball and Archery. 



HARTLEN, EDNA LOUISE 

Stenographic Course 

Edna is little on the reserved side, 
but is a good sport, so she makes 
friends. She enjoys skating at the 
Boston Skating Club and listening to 
the radio. Like everybody else, she 
would like to be a success. 








HARTMAN, DAVID PAUL 

Stenographic Course 

David intends to join the Navy and 
to see the world before settling down 
to the quiet life. He likes sports, 
brunettes, and Howard Johnson's ice 
cream. His only dislikes are sweater 
girls and teachers. Patience and 
quietness are a couple of his virtues. 

Honor Roll II. 



HARTNETT. DONALD 

Practical Arts Course 

"Well, I finally made it," says 
Don when congratulated on reieiving 
his diploma. Don's likeable person 
ality has made him many friends and 
his everready wit has provided many 
hearty chuckles. Keep up that smile, 
Don, and you are sure to be a su> 

Cafeteria II, 111. IV. 





HATFIELD. EILEEN ELIZABETH 

Stenographic Course 

Eileen's sparkling wit and good 
humor have added many moments ol 
hilarity to her crowd. This popular 
senior with a personality bubbling over 
with enthusiasm can usually be found 
dancing at the Tote or at Twombley's 
with "Cobina." She has to her credit 
one of best humor sections of the 
"Mirror" ever printed. 

Humor Editor of Mirror. 

Dramatic Club. 

Sophomore Nominating Committee. 

Sophomore Social Committee. 



HAWLEY. LOIS ELAINE 

Technical Course 

Before school you usually find Lois 
at the blackboard with those two othci 
li" girls, trying to figure out a 
Trig, problem. This girl, who al- 
ways looks on the bright side ol 
things, likes sweet music and mathe- 
matics. Her wish, to be successful, is 
certain to be fulfilled. 

Bowling II, III. 





HAWLEY, WALTER DEXTER 

College Preparatory Course 

When anybody hears the words 
"Why?" and "So What!" echoing 
through the corridors and classrooms 
he can be pretty sure that Walter is 
present. As an electrical engineer he 
will undoubtedly be a great success 
He likes apple pie, ballroom dancing, 
and teasing M. R. and T. C, but dis- 
likes getting up before daylight. 

Freshman Nominating Committee. 



HAYDIN, MILDRED JUNE 

Stenographic Course 
Is that good.'" says "Mil'," who 
likes swimming, skating, and music, 
as well as coffee ice-cream sodas in 
Brigham's with "Sullie," but dislikes 
being called "Millie." She is at her 
best with her friends. "The Ameri 
can Melody Hour," Eddie Cantor, and 
Bing Crosby are her favorite radio 
programs. Although she is always 
getting lost in the hospital, "Mil" 
wishes to be a medical secretary. She 
is good-natured but bashful. 

Usher at graduation. 

Honor Roll I, II, III. 





HIMEON. CONSTANCE MARION 
Business Machines Course 

Connie wants to become a hair 
dresser, and show up the ones who say 
she wants to become a model. What- 
ever one she chooses, she's sure to be 
a success. She likes horseback riding 
with Nathalie and likes to have Mr. 
Ward correct her in English. 

Mirror Room Agent II, III. 

Dramatic Club II, III. 



HODGSON, JEAN MARIE 

Stenographic Course 

"Hi, kids!" says Jeanie as she joins 
her group of friends, who are pleased 
to have friendly Jean among their 
ranks. Jean likes hayrides and long 
walks, [fteferably with a certain Mar- 
ine. After leaving school she would 
like to become a secretary for a good- 
looking employer. 

Bowling II. 

Gym Team Captain II, III. 

Honor Roll II, III. 

Sophomore Dance Committee. 



HITCHCOCK, WELDON 

Accounting Course 

Mild-mannered Hitchie has his eye 
on the President's office for 1976: that 
is, if Roosevelt isn't still there. If not 
successful then, he would probably 
end up "chasm" flies" for the Red 
Sox or any baseball team, as long as 
it's a baseball team. 

Baseball III. IV. 

Mirror Room Agent II, III, IV. 



HOLMSTROM, MARJORIE 

CHARLOTTE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Margie's" greatest ambition is to 
be a violinist with the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra. She enjoys prac- 
ticing the violin, dancing, writing let- 
ters, and drinking chocolate sodas. 
She admits that she talks too long on 
the phone, and that she dislikes doing 
homework, Frank Sinatra, waiting, 
and catty girls. Best of luck, Margie, 
in your musical aspirations. 



HOWARD, JOHN ALLEN 

Technical Course 

"How's it going?'' asks Jack as he 
approaches a group of his iriends. His 
goal in life is to be able to sleep 
through one German period without 
waking up. Jack prides himself on 
his gentlemanly conduct and his 
ability to pay attention to the teachers. 
Fie enjoys chocolate frappes and col- 
lege basketball. 

Honor Roll I, II. 

Football '44. 



JACOBS, ELEANOR MARIE 

Practical Arts Course 

Eleanor plans to become a business 
executive so she can take the after- 
noons off and take in a Van Johnson 
movie, that is, if the waiting line isn't 
too long. She spends her time mind- 
ing children, a task for which this 
good-natured lady is well suited. 





JENSEN, KENNETH HENRY 

Clerical Course 

Clem hails from Lincoln. That 
hasn't prevented him, however, from 
being one of the gang. His ambition 
is to join the Navy or the Merchant 
Marine when he finishes school. 



JOYCE, PAUL E. 

Practical Arts Course 

Whenever you see that model for a 
men's clothing store with those flash- 
ing clothes and that meticulous groom- 
ing, you can be certain it's Paul, who 
is probably running after Don or 
Rooney to reclaim long outstanding 
debts. Paul's everready smile and 
pleasing appearance have made him 
one of the most popular boys in the 
senior class. 



JONES. MARJORIE ANN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Gung-ho!", "Jonesey!" Your 
stable of thoroughbreds will give you 
so much horsemanship in the open 
that you will be ready for your pet 
pastime, sleeping. Your friendly, tor- 
giving spirit and your lively manner 
endear you not only to a certain right- 
guard but to your numerous friends 
in Manomet and those who walk with 
you to Weston. 

Auditor I. 

Cheer Leader Captain III, IV. 

Dramatic Club III. 

Social' II. 

Basketball, Volley Ball, Badminton. 

Baseball, North Junior Alumnae. 



JUDKINS, WARREN DEXTER 

Technical Course 

Ask the boys of IVB who is the 
most conscientious boy in the class and 
the unanimous answer will be "War- 
ren Judkins." This senior is of the re- 
served type, but his unwavering good 
conduct and friendly sincerity have 
made him many friends. Although 
he has not yet definitely decided on 
what his future will consist of, War- 
ren is sure to be a success in whatever 
he does. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 







KAUFMAN, SELMA JUDYTH 

College Preparatory Course 

"Sel" likes all sports, especially 
football and hockey (wonder why?), 
"Tote" on Saturday nights, and Mr. 
Hodge's apples. Having white socks 
to lend for gym makes her a friend in- 
deed to all girls in her gym class. 
Next year she plans to attend a secre- 
tarial school. Her ambition is to en- 
joy life, which she is sure to do. 

Literary Staff of the Mirror. 

Art Staff of the Mirror. 

Senior Dance Committee. 

Honor Roll II. 

Dramatic Club. 



KEEFE, JOSEPH JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

Joe is one of the members of the 
Class of 1945 of whom we are justly 
proud. He left us to enter the Navy 
before the year was out and thereby 
became another member of our class 
that is in military service. Our best 
wishes go with him for a safe and 
speedy return. 





KELLEY, JUNE RUTH 

Stenographic Course 

"Geisler, wait for me!" That's 
June trying to keep up with J. G., 
and also trying to keep those all "a" 
report cards. Long walks she likes, 
but the slippery corridors of W. H. S. 
annoy her. With her dimples and 
sparkling personality, we know she 
will some day achieve her ambition. 
— to be a lawyer. 

Secretary and Treasurer II, III. 

Mirror Staff II, III, IV. 

Sophomore Social Committee. 

P. T. A. Usher; Class Day Usher. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 



KELLY, A. RUSSELL 

Business Machine Course 

Patient, good-natured "Russ," who 
wants to get into the Navy now and 
later to be a big man in this small 
world, may be heard to say, "How's 
it goin'?" whenever he greets you 
with his warm smile. "Kel" likes 
drinking coffee frappes with "Bev," 
sports, dancing, and nice music, but 
he dislikes homework, quiet girls, and 
moody people. 

Senior Dance Chairman. 

Sophomore and Junior Nominating 
Committees; Band I, II, III, IV. 








KENNEN. BERNARD FRANK 

Practical Arts Course 

Bernie complains that he is too con- 
scientious with the opposite sex. (He 
and Joe Zammuta must be mutual 
friends). Being assiduous and neat, 
however, assures his being a success 
in the drug business after the war. 
Until then, he plans to hasten the day 
of victory by entering the armed 
forces this summer and joining the 
medical corps. Good luck! 



KENNESON, LAURA MAY 

Business Machines Course 

"Kenney" is one to have on you. 
own side when it comes to debating 
The mystery book she plans to write 
in the near future ought to be a killer 
— honesty being her policy. She hopes 
to lead a happy, successful life but no 
housework, thank you. 

Honor Roll II. 

Room Agent III, IV. 

Archery and Volley Ball III. 





KERINS. MARJORIE L. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Margie" aspires to be a hair- 
dresser after taking a trip around the 
world and perhaps trying her talents 
on music. She likes spooky movies and 
listens regularly to "Yankee Tune 
tory." She also likes to go to Bos- 
ton on Saturdays with "The Gang." 
Conceited or selfish people are of no 
use to this girl whose best virtue is a 
sunny smile. 



KEZFR, MARION JUNE 

stenographic Course 

If you hear "silly girl," you know 
it must be "Mernic," who is widely 
known for her novelty pin collection. 
Howling on Saturday nights, draw- 
ing, "Those We Low," and "Take 
h Or Leave It" take up much of her 
time. After graduating she expects to 
start work in an office or to join the 
WAVES. 

Usher at Graduation. 

Honor Roll I, II, III. 





KILPATRICK. LOIS E. 

Stenographic Course 

Lois admits she is always saying the 
wrong thing at the wrong time, which 
causes her untold blushing. Tins 
likeable senior has nothing to Ic.ir, 
her friends will always remain faith- 
ful. Lois has in mind becoming a 
medical secretary — a good job for a 
fine girl. 

Sophomore Social Committee. 



KINGSLEY, DONALD 

HAMMOND 

Practical Arts Course 

Don, whose ambition is to become 
a radio scriptwriter, tells us that peo- 
ple call him plenty of different names. 
"That's my toy who said that" ex- 
claims Don when he hears Crosby 
and Hope on the radio. He can con- 
trol his temper most of the time, but 
in Miss Allen's room anything can 
happen. Don was voted by his djss- 
mates as the boy whose forehead is 
most likely to recede. He likes music, 
sports, Sophomore girls, and almost 
anybody, though some of his best 
friends are people. 





KOKIDKO, ANDRY 

Technical Course 

The wit of IV B himself. Andry is 
one of the most popular boys in the 
senior class and his famous Kokidko 
smile can be found at all Waltham 
High activities, especially the foot- 
ball games and class socials. He en- 
joys tinkering in lab and absorbing 
Miss Hart's German lessons. What- 
ever the future holds in store for 
Andry, it's bound to be enhanced 
greatly by the Kokidko personality. 



KOUNDAKJIAN, ADELE F. 

Stenographic Course 

Some of that hilarious laughter 
which rings through the corridors ol 
W. H. S. belongs to this future medi- 
cal secretary. Although she's never 
on time, she's fast enough in the 
sports circles. Check your watches by 
Adele — she's here just a second be- 
fore 'the bell. 

Honor Roll. 

Junior Prom Committee. 

Dramatic Club. 

Girls' Varsity Basketball II. III. 





LANDRY, CATHERINE MARIE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Kay" is going to take a business 
course when she finishes school and 
thereby assure herself of a good posi- 
tion. She has an easy time in getting 
along with her classmates because of 
her pleasing personality. She likes to 
play the piano and to dance but dis- 
likes oral compositions. 



LANGILL, JEANNE MARY 

Practical Arts Course 

Jeanne likes Cambridge and boys 
with whiffles, but getting up in the 
morning and conceited boys are "nix" 
to her. She also likes dancing, and 
music by Bing Crosby. She hopes to 
go away this summer with Alice and 
have as good a time as the previous 
summer. 

Dramatic Club. 



LAROSA, JOSEPH WILLIAM 

Clerical Course 
. Joe is an all-round sports fan, tak- 
ing a great interest in football, bas- 
ketball, and baseball. His sports' in- 
terests must have made him plenty 
healthy, for Joe has never been absent 
at Waltham High. He plans to join 
the Navy and afterwards will make a 
success in the business world. 



LEACH, MARILYN ELEANOR 

Business Machines Course 

"Mel'' answers all letters pronto, 
one sure way of keeping popular. She 
also likes to receive mail, the absence 
of which she will never have to worry 
about. Our hopes are hers that she 
become a successful commercial pilot, 
her ambition. 





LEAF, CARLTON DURHAM 

Accounting Course 

When they hear, "Hy, there! How's 
it going?", they know Sleepy is out to 
hit their bankroll, especially Brady's. 
Carl enjo.s fishing with Tasker in 
Maine and sleeping. We know he'll 
make a success in the Navy as that is 
his ambition. 

Basketball II, III, IV. 

Baseball III. 

Athletic Committee. 

Junior Prom Committee. 



LEBLANC, AGNES MARIE 

Business Machines Course 

Agnes likes a good time (don't we 
all!). Vacations with loads of swim- 
ming are the acme of delight with her. 
Of course, to make things perfect, a 
courteous gentleman with a heavy wal- 
let would be necessary. Agnes, how- 
ever, should have little trouble ac- 
quiring this. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 

Dramatic Club. 





LEBLANC, EDWARD PETER 

Practical Arts Course 

Eddie's claim to fame is that he al- 
ways pays back borrowed money 
promptly and never fails to keep a 
date. He enjoys all sports, indoor 
and outdoor, but dislikes having to 
sweep the gym floor during exercises. 
Eddie's destination is the Navy, but 
afterwards he would like to drive a 
truck for a big concern. 

Dramatic Club II. 

Basketball IV. 



LEE, DONALD COBURN 

Technical Course 

Don's favorite expression, "Hey, 
Lester!". He is well known in IV B 
circles and everyone knows his ambi- 
tion is to beat Roger in a game of 
nine-ball. Getting S. P. in trouble 
and keeping U. B. H. on the ball is 
Don's favorite pastime. He was on 
the Honor Roll 1,3; and a Big Tooth 
Operator in the R. A. C. 





LELIEVRE, LORRAINE 

Teachers' College Course 

"Goodness Gravy" says "Lulu" as 
she munches on potato chips and 
teases J. S. Anyone who isn't a good 
sport doesn't appeal to her, but Bob 
Hope, good books and baseball do. 
After graduation she is planning to 
train at Newton Hospital to be a cadet 
nurse. You can be sure that she will 
succeed in whatever she undertakes. 

Baseball II, III, IV. 



LE SHANE, PHYLLIS 

Teachers' College Course 

"Phil" wants to become a Navy 
nurse (which is probably so that she'll 
be able to see more of that sailor of 
hers), but right now she is very busy 
with school activities or her favorite 
sports — football, hockey, and base- 
ball. Everyone who knows her, will 
agree that a good sense of humor and 
sunny disposition will win her many 
friends in whatever she does. 

Honor Roll II, II, IV. 

Cheer Leader III, IV. 

Badminton III, IV. 

Senior Dance Committee. 

Bowling III, IV. 

Archery III. 

Baseball II, HI, IV. 





LOGAN, ELAINE AVERILL 

Practical Arts Course 

"Jeepers," says sunny dispositioned 
Elaine. This exclamation was prob- 
ably prompted by the appearance of a 
hot fudge sundae or letters from her 
friends in the Service. She plans to 
become a junior partner in her father's 
jewelry store. 

Junior Nominating Committee. 



LOWE. JOHN H. 

Practical Arts Course 

If there is anything that irks 
"Herby" it is to see black polish on a 
girl's fingernails, but if she has red 
hair, everything is forgiven. His se- 
cret ambition is to live to see a smok- 
ing-room and swimming-pool in W. H. 
S. His outstanding characteristic is 
punctuality plus, (so he says.) His 
broad grin and vast store of repartee 
will help him achieve his goal in life, 
whatever it may be. 

Band II, III, IV. 








LUNNY, FRANCES IRENE 

Practical Arts Course 

T.c-nnv likes to draw and write, and 
her ambition is to write a book. Her 
sunny disposition and smiling person- 
ality explains her popularity. All 
sports and leisure time are tops with 
her. 



LUPIEN, GEORGE LOUIS, JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

George pretends to be shy, but 
those who know him know better. 
■jjp spends most of his time ex- 
plaining to Miss A. how he was not 
at fault, but the explaining is usually 
useless. However, that is not to deter 
him from making good in the United 
States Post Oflite, where he hopes to 
go after school. 

Honor Roll II. III. 

Cafeteria worker III, IV. 





MACDONALD, BARBARA R. 

Stenographic Course 

"Mac" is an ardent Crosbv fan, 
and loves Charlie Spivak*s orchestra. 
She likes tall soldiers and does a lot 
of corresponding with them. Murder 
mysteries are her delight. Her am- 
bition is to go to a business school. 
She loves hot tudge sundaes at Brig- 
ham's and the brownies in school. 



MAFFEI, MARY ELIZABETH 

Stenographic Course 

Wanted: A government position in 
Honolulu. She likes Artie Shaw, 
dancing, going to the RKO, and hot 
fudge sundaes at the Shore Drug 
Company, but dislikes waiting tor 
Pauline, and making oral reports. She 
is often heard saving. "I like- that!" 
01 "Hurry up, Polly!" Her worst 
fault is borrowing money. A certain 
M. trine and football player arc tops 
with her. 

Honor Roll II. 





MANDILE, JULIA A. 

Accounting Course 

Holding her temper and giving a 
smile to take its place arc two good 
reasons for the future success of tins 
girl. Although "Mandy*s mind is 
not made up definitely, she wants to 
make a success in the outside world. 
Meanwhile, dancing, sports, and go- 
ing to the U. S. O. will occupy most 
of her time. 



MANERO. CHARLES 
Trade School 





MANNING. JACK BARRETT 

Accounting Course 

"How do" says Jack (probably 
when he meets that certain Junior 
girl). Although he is always late, he 
gets there. He likes the "Tote," Bob 
Hope, and good music but not walk- 
ing or rushing around. He is going 
to join tfie Navy but until then will 
content himself playing baseball. 

Baseball III. 



MARA. ROBERT JOSEPH 

Practical Arts Course 

Bob left our ranks this year to join 
the Navy where this quiet young man 
will make a fine sailor. While he at- 
tended Waltham High he was one o( 
the gang in room 112. Our best 
wishes go with him in his new ad- 
venture. 





McCANN, MURIEL 

Business Machines Course 

If there's anything Muriel can't 
stand, it's a smoke-filled room. She 
likes to go bowling and attends the 
movies fairly regularly. Her ideal 
ambition is to be successful in life. 

Honor Roll IV. 



McCANN, RITA JOSEPHINE 

College Preparatory 

Rita dislikes people who misunder- 
stand her and likes Mr. Hodge's ap- 
ples, playing the piano, movies, sports, 
and Mr. Ward's wit. "Mac" hopes 
to follow in her sister's footsteps and 
become a Navy nurse, for she would 
like to sail around the world. Sounds 
like fun ! 

Basketball II. 

Dramatic Club 



McCarthy, Barbara ann 

Stenographic Course 

"Mac," "Fat," or "Barb," as we 
know her relishes vanilla milk shakes 
at "Twombley's." Being a member 
of the WAVES is the height of her 
ambition. School and work are her 
major disinterests. One can generally 
hear "Bay, that's pretty sharp," when 
something appeals to her. Thursda/ 
nights are devoted to Crosby and hh 
program when Sinatra isn't broadcast- 
ing. 



McELHINEY, GEORGE H. 

Special Course 

"Frankie" is always happy ri ' 
willing to sit down and beat o. 
solid "Boogie Woogie" number in 
dance intermission. Some day h* 
hopes to become a surgeon, but »i 
can't imagine this Frank Sinatra <n 
cutting up people. He dislikes c i- 
petitors. What about his flashy b. >\ 
ties. 

Chairman Senior Nominati. u C.» u;i- 
mittee. 

Honor Roll IV. 

Band I, II, III. 





McGUlGAN, HERBERT ARNOLD 

Accounting Course 

Herb this year is realizing his life's 
goal, that of graduating from Wal- 
tham High. He doesn't say what he 
wishes to do later, but whatever he 
undertakes Herb has the ability to 
make good. He claims he is alwa-. s 
on time, especially when girls are con- 
cerned. 



McGUINNESS, ARLENE RITA 

Stenographic Course 

Oh, shucks, "Ginger," don't be 
afraid of falling from those horses you 
can ride so well ! When you be- 
come the perfect secretary, you'll have 
more- time for dancing, roller-skating, 
and Bing Crosby. 

Honor Roll III, IV. 





McGUIRE, LEO WILLIAM 

Practical Arts Course 

Mac was the boy who was on the 
receiving end of many of those spec- 
tacular Zeno passes (remember the 
Everett game?) He likes all sports, 
especially football. Mac plans to 
finish school this year and then join 
the Marine Corps, where he is sure to 
make a fine Marine. 

Football IV. 



McLEAN. DONALD GORDON 

Technical Course 

"Mucker" would like to be a drafts- 
man after he gets through with his 
Army life. He likes lemon cokes, 
soft music, Boogie Woogie, Bob 
Hope, and Brunettes. His dislikes 
platinum blondes, too much jive mu- 
sic, and homework. One can usually 
see him and Bill S. exchanging home- 
work before school. 

Senior Dance Committee. 

President of IV B Club. 





McNEIL, ELIZABETH ANN 
Stenographic Course 
"Mickey" is a Bing Crosby fan. 
When you hear "Well, I wouldn't say 
that now," you can be sure she is in 
the immediate vicinity. She delights 
in murder stories, hot fudge sundaes 
at Brigham's, and potato chips at 
lunch. She works in Cronin's on 
week-ends but plans to get an office 
job and have a career after she grad- 
uates. 



MILLIGAN, ROGER WILLIAM 

Technical Course 

If by chance, you say the "Crusher" 
has no virtues, he will retort, "That 
don't cut no ice." Besides playing his 
trumpet, he likes dancing, girls, and 
plenty of time (which he won't find 
if he has to battle the Japs), and 
would like to be the first "white man" 
on the Waltham High School faculty. 

Band I, II, III, IV. 





MOBILIA, ANGELINA 

Stenographic Course 

"Angie" is the "cute" little pocket- 
sized edition commonly referred to as 
"The girl with the Golden Voice," 
but she'd rather be called "Angel." 
She likes Frank Sinatra, and Harry 
James. She has an amiable person- 
ality, but can't stand conceited people 
and her hair, which annoys her on a 
rainy day. "Good things come in 
small packages." 

Honor Roll I. 



MOLLICA, BEVERLY ANN 

College Course 

If you hear a pretty, black-haired 
girl ask "What do you say?", that's 
"Moldy." She wants to study jour- 
nalism, in which she undoubtedly got 
her start by gathering news from the 
rest of the Cedarwood Hillbillies at 
Brigham's. Her good nature makes 
her popular with the gang which can 
often be seen hiking up to the reservoir 
or exploring the wilds of Cedarwood. 

Freshman and Sophomore Social 
Committees. 

Honor Roll I. 

Dramatic Club I. 

Football Usher III, IV. . 








MONAHAN. MARGARET MARY 

Business Machines Course 

People just can't anger Peggy be- 
cause she has too firm a control ol 
temper. She is always ready foi 
dancing or swimming, but gim and 
gym-showers are taboo with her. She 
hats her heart set on being a WAVI , 
an ambition at which we know she II 
do well. 



MONKS. ANNA MAY ROSE 

Clerical Course 

Anna can always be counted on fol 
being on time and also for being too 
I rank. She should worry; these- two 
characteristics will surely assure her oi 
luture suness in her chosen field, be- 
ing a Powers model. She likes tall, 
blonde boys, and, if she ever realizes 
ber ambition, she'll never have to 
worry about their being around. 

Bowling II. 

Archery II. 





MONTI. IRO. OI.ORIA MARIA 

PractKal Arts Course 

After graduating from the N. E. 
Conservatory ol Musk, tins vety pop- 
ular lass plans to undertake a grand 
adventure, that of organizing a latin 
American orchestra. At the present 
time, she is attending the N. E. Con- 
servatory. 

Dramatic Club IV. 

Red Cross II. 



MORREAI.E. ELEANOR 
Stenographic Course 
"I wonaer," is Eleanor's favorite 

expression, and her ambition is t, 
come the manager of Diana s Sweet 
Shop. She likes driving and dancing 
..t the Totem Pole. She enjoys Red 
skelton s program and also likes to 
listen to Vaughn Monroe's music. She 
has a sense of humor. 
Honor Roll I. 








MORKI AIM. VIRGINIA 

Stenographic Course 

Whenever you arc looking for 
"Ginny," all you fuse to do is to no- 
tice the tallest girl in the crowd. 
Seriously, she really is a swell pal and 
loves to meet new friends. Her one 
ambition is to become .1 private sec- 
retary. "Ginny" enjoys evenings skat- 
ing, and listening to Harry James and 
Lux Radio Theatre. If she isn't Work- 
ing, you will usually see her drinking 
cottee floats at the drug store. 

Honor Roll II. 



MORSE, R. RAYMOND, JR. 

Technical Course 

ll during an intermission ..I ■ 
dance you hear the "hot" rhythm ol 
the drums, you may be sure it's "Bob" 
plasing. When asked questions ic 
gardmg a certain junior blonde, he 
will calmly reply. "What's the mat- 
ter' Ya crazy or sumthin'?" His 
ambition is to be a drummer or an 
aviator, at either of which he will no 
doubt be a success. 

Football II. III. IV. 

N. J. H. Alumni Committee III, IV. 

Dramatic Club IV. 

Vice-President of parties for IV B 
Club. 







Mosul R. MARJORIE ELNA 

Practical Arts Course 

Marge wants "to travel where the 
West commences." Good-natured, 
she worries little and figures every- 
thing has to work out somehow. She 
would give three cheers for the Army 
any time. 



MYERS. JANICE G. 

Teachers' College Course 

"Oh, my heavens!" remarks "Jan" 
when something startles or disturbs 
her. She hopes to attend Rhode Island 
State and to major in Business Admin- 
istration. She likes interviewing bash- 
ful football heroes and teasing Neil, 
but does not like having her locker be- 
hind swinging doors and being called 
"Newtonite.' Her worse fault is hur- 
rying everywhere she goes, except to 
class. 

Honor Roll I, II, III, IV. 

Bowling II. III. IV. 

"Mirror" Room Agent III. 

Literary Staff III. 

Exchange Editor of "Mirror," IV. 

Co-Editor of High School Column, 
III, IV. 

Freshman Nominating Committee. 

Writer of Senior Class Will. 



MURPHY, ( I.ARE 

Stenographic Course 

II you hear "Aw gee, fellas!" or 
"Hey! Wait for me." you can be sure 
it's Kim, whose high ambition is to 
be successful in everything she does. 
Excelling in English, reading good 
books and wearing pretty clothes de- 
light her. She emphatically dislikes 
bow ties and conceited boys. Tning 
to be cheerful at all times is her finest 
virtue, although sometimes she is not 
too successful. 



NETHERCOTE, GRACE MARIE 

Stenographic Course 

"Legs" would like to travel around 
the world and then settle down as a 
private secretary. Conceited people 
and Harriet Hilliard's voice are her 
dislikes. An evening at "Tote" with 
B. J., Bing Crosby, and the Boston 
Braves are tops with her. Although 
she spends hours waiting for "Barb" 
and "Maggy," they remain the insep- 
e rabies. 

Basketball I, II, II. 

Class Day Usher. 



ESI 



NEWCOMB, NANCY ELIZABETH 

College Preparatory Course 

"Nan " finds time for everyone and 
everything, but how she does it, is a 
mystery. Mr. Ward, Mr. Hodge s 
"apples," sports, and dancing at To- 
tem Pole are tops with her. Next year 
she plans to attend Middlebury Col- 
lege. There her friendly spirit is sure 
to win her many friends. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 

Assistant Editor of "Mirror." 

President of the Dramatic Club. 

Basketball. 

Badminton. 

Baseball. 

Archery. 

Bowling. 



NIX, NEIL 

Technical Course 

"Who's got a pencil" as!:s "Dusty" 
as he barely beats the bell at the open- 
ing of school (With that big smile, 
how can anyone refuse him?) His 
talent in tap-dancing has been shared 
throughout the state with our fighting 
men. His goal is an engineering 
school. Western songs, horseback rid- 
ing, and egg salad sandwiches fill his 
mind when he isn't busy making 
Janice blush. 

North Junior Alumnae. 

Dramatic Club. 

IV B Club. 

Literary Staff of Mirror '44. 



OLIVERI, VIRGINIA ANN 

Stenographic Course 

"Ginnie" is a brown-haired, 

brown-eyed vivacious girl who is seen 
racing through the corridors trying to 
outrun the bell. She is the "cute" 
drum-majorette who has led the Wal- 
tham Senior Band for three years. Her 
sweet disposition is the envy of every- 
one. 

Honor Roll. 

Advertising Committee. 

Basketball. 

Badminton. 

Bowling and Band I, II, III. 

Drum Majorette. 



NIOSE, SUSAN JANE 

Business Machines Course 

Sue wants to be a success in what- 
ever she undertakes and then to travel 
around the world. She likes music, 
especially Western songs and popular 
ones, sung by Sinatra. Sue is alwa\s 
on time and dislikes to be kept wait- 
ing. She goes fo bowling and the 
Lux Radio Theater. 



NOYES, CAROLYN DAVIS 

Stenographic Course 

Sandy-haired "Cal's" 'destination is 
stud>ing languages and journalism at 
Boston University. After that she 
plans to travel in Europe on a bicycle. 
She is one of "Frankie's" most de- 
voted fans, and is "mad" about hot 
fudge sundaes, spaghetti, and the 
color blue. People who are too proper 
and never have anything to say annoy 
her. 

Sophomore Class Auditor. 

Member of Dramatic Club. 

And D. V. Club. 

Parents' Night and Class Day Usher. 



ORECHIA, RUTH MARIE 

Teachers' College Course 

"Ruthie" wants to become a Navy 
Nurse after training at Newton Hos- 
pital and we all know that her sin- 
cerity and patience will be appreciated 
very much by everybody with whom 
she comes in contact. Right now, 
though, she is prety busy attending 
hockey games or eating ice cream to 
the rhythm of Guy Lombardo. Neither 
"Frankie" nor rainy days appeal to 
Ruth. 

Honor Roll I, II, III. 









OWEN, LOUISE CUSHMAN 

Teachers' College Course 

"Oh! my sainted aunt" is all Lou 
can say when she has to wait for Phil. 
Lou's ambition is to become an ex- 
perimental dietitian and we wish her 
success. She enjoys dropping in at 
Brigham's on the way home from 
school, listening, to the Lux Radio 
Theater, and almost any sport. 

Dramatic Club I, II, III, IV. 

Senior Dance Committee IV. 

Honor Roll IV. 



PALUMBO, GILDA ANN 

Stenographic Course 

"Jill" is always smiling and giving 
out a cheerful grin. She likes our 
Navy and Frank Sinatra, and is espe- 
cially fond of vanilla ice cream with 
peanut butter, but she doesn't care for 
short men and people never on time. 
We wisn you the best of luck, "Jill." 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 

Basketball, Baseball, Bowling. 

Volley Ball, Archery. 

South Jr. Alumni Committee. 

Sports Editor, Mirror. 

Junior Prom Committee. 

Dramatic Club II. 





PALUMBO, NICHOLAS 

Practical Arts Course 

Nick was the popular halfback of 
our football team and occasioned 
many "oohs" and "ahs" from our co- 
eds as they watched his booming 
spirals sail over the head of enemy de- 
fenders. Nick, like so many others 
of our class, is headed for the service, 
and our best wishes go with him as 
with all the rest. 

Football IV. 



PAUL, ISABEL R. 

Special Course 

"Isie" is bound for Colby where 
she will train to be a laboratory tech- 
nician to prepare for a "WAVE" uni- 
form. A familiar figure leading the 
W. H. S. band, she won first prize at 
the U. A. V. Convention in '43, and 
is a popular U. S. O. entertainer. 

Drum Majorette II. Ill, IV. 

Badminton and Archery III. 










PARELLA. ESTHER JULIA 

Special Course 

Esther likes ice-skating and talking 
for hours with Mary on the telephone. 
Being on time and being dependable 
are her virtues. She is going to join the 
Cadet Nurse Corps, and have a great 
vacation. 



PEARSON. BEVERLY MERRITT 

College Course 

Bev. is the friendly and popular 
senior, who is so often mistaken for 
her twin sister. Besides wanting to 
join the Cadet Nurse Corps, shi would 
like very much to see student govern- 
ment in Waltham High School. W'c 
know Bev. will be a success at what- 
ever she tries. 

Honor Roll 111. 

Member of Dramatic Club. 

Member of Pennant Club. 



PEARSON. BARBARA (LAIRE 

Stenographic Course 

"Oh, my soul," says CaLina, as her 
hazel eyes grow wide when Delia 
mimics Boyer. Her loyalty and cheer- 
fulness have won her many friends. 
She is our constant model of the latest 
hair styles, likes to read poetry, and 
to use odd shades of nail polish. I 
ceitcd boys and dish washing top her 
list of dislikes! With that vivacious 
personality, we know success will be 
hers. 

Chairman ot Sophomore Social. 

Honor Roll II. 

Via President III. IV. 

Dramatic Club II. III. 

Secretary ul Pennant Club IV. 



PEARSON. 1 HI IMA B. 

Accounting Couise 

Thel, that cute and energetic girl, 
Impcs l" get a good office position 
alter graduation. Her winning smile 
and pleasing personality will certainly 
make her future life a success. 

Bowling '43, '44, 

Archery '44. 





PENDERGAST, MATTHEW 



I'HIPPS. FARRAND DAVID 

Special Course 

I hrc-e may keep a secret, if two of 
them are dead.'' is the saying often 
heard from Farrand, who enjoys bas- 
ketball, golf and music, his tavorite 
song being "I Got Plenty of Nothing 
and Plenty of Nothing for Me." He- 
cares little for people who can not say 
"no," and who arc always going 
around with a chip on their shoulder. 

Mirror Advertising Staff. 





PINTABONA, LORETTA 

Stenographic Course 

Lorry, a "slugger" in baseball, is 
often heard saying, "Oh, sure." She 
likes Glen Miller and always has an 
ear for the 920 Club. Cars, spaghetti, 
and J. H. are tops on her list of good 
things. Really, Lorry, your wit and 
humor, and likeable personality should 
promote your plans for the future as 
a Cadet Nurse. 

Honor Roll II, III. 



PORTER, JEAN ROBLEE 

Special Course 

"Why sure" says "Jimmic" as one 
..I her friends asks her if she would 
like to have a frappe at Twombly's, 
and, as usual, she gets there right on 
time. To be a nurse is her ambition 
but right now her outside interest is 
writing while listening to the music of 
Woody Herman or Glenn Miller, to a 
friend in the Army Air Corps. 

Junior Prom Committee. 





POST, LEONARD SCOTT 

Technical Course 

"Scottie" claims he dislikes noth- 
ing and likes, best of all, skating, 
swimming, ice cream, sports, dancing, 
and people in general. His gentle- 
manly conduct, punctuality, honesty, 
sincerity, and modesty will undoubt- 
edly win for him many friends in his 
long struggle through life. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 

Band I. II. Ill, IV. 

History Prize III. 



POTTLE, ETHEL E. 

Business Accounting Course 
Smiling is one of Ethel's virtues 
along with getting to school on time. 
She Tikes to travel, collect records, and 
receive mail, while reading and doing 
homework are offensive to her sense- ol 
better judgment. Ethel's sure of ful- 
filling her ambition of making a suc- 
cessful marriage. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 



RAHBERG, V. JEANNE 

Teachers' College Course 

Right now Jeanne's chief interest is 
in a certain Newtonite. Some day 
she hopes to become a nurse and travel 
over the country on a dog sled. Be- 
fore coming to Waltham in her Jun- 
ior year, she attended Acton High 
School, where she exercised her girt 
for drawing, by illustrating the School 
paper. Card games do not appeal to 
her, but she does like outdoor sports, 
roller-skating, and good music. 



RAMSDELL, ELAINE M. 

Stenographic Course 

Our secretary-to-be, "Laney," would 
just love to have her ideal world filled 
with juicy steaks, Frankie Carl's piano 
playing, and a certain somebody from 
N. H. Shy boys are a bore to her. 
Most of her pin money is spent on air- 
mail stamps that eventually reach the 
Navy and Marine Corps. Her ambi- 
tion is to be happy, and we know she 
will be. 

"Elaine the fair, Elaine the love- 
able." 




L, 




RAND, JOANE PAULINE 

Stenographic Course 

If she's auburn-haired, green-eyed, 
Irish, and continually seen arguing 
politics with Messrs. Ward and Mo- 
sher, it's Cedarwood's one man Cham- 
ber of Commerce — "Randy." The 
only thing besides her beloved Cedar- 
wood that will content her is raising 
Irish setters on a Kelly-green ranch in 
Alaska. 

Committee for Student Govern- 
ment III. 

Basketball Usher II. 

O. H. Club II, III. 

Dramatic Club. 



RANDO, THOMAS JOHN 

Stenographic Course 

Tommy's ambition is to become a 
musician and we all know how easily 
he should become a success, for who 
can forget Tommy's solid renditions 
on his red hot accordion? There's 
nothing extraordinary about him ; he's 
just one of those students who goes 
steadily on, and is liked by every- 
body. 




J 




RANKIN, JEANNE ELIZABETH 

Accounting Course 

Civil Service will claim Dutchess 
first; afterwards domestic activities. 
She likes movies, tennis, dancing at 
the "Tote," and photography. "Hold- 
ing my temper is one of my virtues," 
she claims. With that asset she is sure 
to make a success in her domestic ac- 
tivities. 



RAVESI, JOSEPHINE A. 

Stenographic Course 

"Do you really think so?" "Jo" 
asks. She never hears the answer she 
wants, but you can be sure she'll keep 
trving. Her favorite band leader is 
Glenn Miller and she idolizes 
"Frankie." "Jo's" ambition is to 
search for her "one and only" and set- 
tle down to be a good housewife. 





RAYMOND, FLORENCE 

Stenographic Course 

"Flo's" best virtue is her tolerance. 
Getting up in the morning she hates 
but sincere people, dancing, ice-skat- 
ing, receiving mail from California, 
and fried clams are what she likes. 
She'll take her music on the sweet 
side, meaning Bing C.'s singing. She's 
a C. A. P. Cadet, and her ambition is 
to fly a plane. She is a most sincere 
person. 

"The aim, if reached or not, makes 
great the life." 



RIDENTI, MARY ANNE 

College Preparatory Course 

Mary likes people in general, music, 
interesting radio prorgams, dancing, 
and her senior homeroom teacher. She 
is friendly and easy to get along with 
and she doesn't mind waiting patient- 
ly for T. C. We hope that she real- 
izes her ambition and goes to college 
next year. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 

Basketball II. 

Bowling II, III. 





RIER, ROBERT CARLTON 

Stenographic Course 

Bob is one of the outstanding boys 
of the senior class. This popular 
senior has won more honors and has 
received more trophies than probablv 
any other student. But why shouldn't 
he? His likeable manner and cheer- 
ful personality would rate him high on 
anyone's list. Best wishes to the suc- 
cess of a grand fellow. 

Football III. 

Baseball II, III, IV. 

Hockey IV. 

President of Pennant Club. 

Sports Editor of Mirror IV. 



RIZZO, JOSEPHINE R. 

Accounting Course 

"Jo" likes to spend an evening lis- 
tening to the radio or plaving gin 
rummy ; that is, when she isn't out 
dancing with the boys. She wishes to 
travel in Europe after she has made 
her pile of money. 

Honor Roll II. 








ROBERTSON, CORRINNE FAITH 

Business Machines Course 

"Christopher Columbus!" Corky's 
pet saying at present. "Tote" does 
just "fine" for any of Corrinnc s 
celebrating. Here is a person one can 
always depend on to help out in diffi- 
cult situations very successfully. 

Dramatic Club. 



ROBINSON, BARBARA MARY 

Practical Arts ( ourse 

Waiting for people, especially Mar- 
gie, is one thing that gauls Barb. 
Another is waiting for letters. Her 
ambition is to travel, preferably with 
a certain soldier. Meanwhile, she 

will continue being always on time 
and having a good disposition. 





ROBINSON. RICHARD 

Technical Course 

"What can you do?" exclaims 
"Red" as he goes about trying to ex- 
change homework — a one-sided ex- 
change. This woman-hater, who in- 
tends to become an engineer, dislikes 
working at the watch factory but likes 
Duke Ellington's orchestra, pay day, 
and dancing at the "Tote." Perhaps 
his gentlemanly conduct will be the 
cause of his success in life. 

Football II, IV. 

Vice President of Recreations of 
IV B Club. 



ROCHE. ARLENE ELIZABETH 

College Course 

If you see a young lady paddling 
through the Panama Canal in a row 
boat on her way around the world, 
you can bet it will be "Illy." In 
case she can't get a rowboat, however, 
she plans to go to Jackson College, 
but in either case, she admits that 
she'll miss the hills of (c-darw 
She claims she's stubborn, but we'll 
all forgive her if she will keep her 
wonderful sense of humor. 

Honor Roll I. II, IV. 

Football Usher. 

Badminton. 

Cedarwood O. H. Club. 





ROCKWOOD. HOWARD 
Practical Arts Course- 
Howie is known by practically every- 
one. This snappy-dressed senior rivals 

Paul Joyce in his natty attire. Howie 
cm usually be found in the library. 
catching up on the latest news ami 
stories or frequenting all the social 
gatherings of Waltham High. 



ROONEY. JOHN F. 

Practical Arts Course 

Johnny will probably make a good 
loan office worker (ask Clark and 
how well he covers their finan 
rial cnbarrassment. ) Johnny's quite 
a lady's man, which probably ex- 
plains his ambition to become the best 
man in RadclifTc. Johnny's one claim 
to fame is his membership in that fa- 
mous trio, the scourge of room 114. 





RUGGLES. HARVEY RICHARD 

Technical Course 

Harvey, sometimes known as "Doc," 
has not quite made up his mind as to 
what school he is going to attend, 
but would like to follow an engi 
peering course. His hobby is build 
ing modef planes. He dislikes girls in 
men's clothing, and being late for 
school, but enjoys hill-billy music, Mr. 
Hollis's jokes, and living in Newton. 

Honor Roll I, II. III. IV. 

Dramatic Club. 

IV B Club. 



SABETTI. ANNA R. 

College Preparatory Course 
"You didn't know I was talented," 
says Anna, after making some remark, 
particularly wittv. She likes to read 
Macaulev and the Saturday Evening 
Post, and she enjoys listening to Mr. 
Ward and good music. Her roll' 
humor and good-hearted nature should 
go far in making her many friends. 

Honor Roll IV. 

Bowling III, IV. 

Dramatic Club IV. 





S( HULTHEIS. CHARLES WILLIAM 

Technical Course 

To be a mechanical engineer, if t>->e 
navy doesn't take him first, is "Bill's" 
ambition. "Things are tough all 
over," he will remark while ponder- 
ing German homework. Dancing at 
the "Tote", Benny Goodman's music. 
exchanging jokes with "Mucker," and 
a quiet evening at home with "Penny" 
are all right with "Schultz." Best of 
luck to you. Bill ! 

Sophomore Social Committee. 

Vice-President of IV B Club in 
charge of "Operations." 



SEESTED. SHIRLEY 

Accounting Course 

Shirley plans to train for a Cadet 
Nurse and to further her training on 
the piano. Her likes range in music 
from Glenn Miller to symphony; and 
in other things include the ocean, 
spring, and French fried potatoes. 
She dislikes oysters and people with 
no sense of humor. 

Bowling, Dramatic Club. 

Honor Roll. 



SHAPIRO, STANLEY 

Practical Arts Course 

One of the boys of our class who 
has already laid aside his school 
things for a uniform and a gun, Stan 
always brought a breath of humor into 
every gathering. He was the spunky 
left-end on our football team. 

Football II, III, IV. 



SIMMONS, ARLENE RAE 

College Course 

"Simmie" is the girl who will be 
remembered for her all "A" report 
cards. The boys and girls who have 
her for a teacher after she graduates? 
from the Framingham Normal School 
will certainly be lucky. Good luck, 
Arlene. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 

Bowling III, IV. 

Basketball III, IV. 

Volley Ball III. 





V 



STARK, GLADYS 

Business Machines Course 

Gladys is one of our peppiest and 
jovial seniors. Any day you can see 
this dimfnutive lass lending a hearty 
laugh to all of her gatherings. She's 
a popular girl and is bound to go far 
with her jovial personality and sense 
of humor. 



STIEFEL. ALBERT DANIEL 

Technical Course 

Al likes to attend religious meet- 
ings and he also likes to sing sacred 
music as well as to hear it. Next 
year he plans to enter Eastern Naza- 
rene College. Although "Al" is 
good-natured and loads of fun, his 
friends all know that he is very sin- 
cere in his ambition to enter the min- 
istry where his enthusiasm and sin- 
cerity should make him successful in 
his chosen field. 

Honor Roll I, II, III. 

Literary Staff of "Mirror" III. 





SULLIVAN, JEAN WINIFRED 

Teachers' College Course 

This ambitious young lady plans to 
take nurses' training at Newton Hos- 
pital. Jean likes attending hockey and 
baseball games and spends as many 
vacations as possible at the "Cape." 
Her steadiness and careful work will 
help her a long way. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 



SWANBERG, MARGARET ANN 

Special Course 

Peggy is rather shy, quiet, and self- 
controlled. She is extremely patient 
when waiting for "Honey" who 
sometimes arrives an hour late. Lighl 
classical music and tennis are her 
likes while work causes her to frown. 
Peggy would like to travel. 

Dramatic Club IV. 

Bowling IV. 





. 



TASKER, THOMAS HUNTLEY 

Stenographic Course 

Fishing on the Maine coast with 
Leaf — that's his ambition. He also 
would like to do the right thing, just 
once. Huntley's good humor, and 
patience have made him very popular, 
and we know he'll never forget Miss 
Mooney's shorthand classes — or those 
dancing lessons with "Murph." 

Baseball II, III. 



TAYLOR, ROBERT WILSON 

Practical Arts Course 

A member of the hard working 
Senior Dance Committee, Bob is a con- 
scientious and valuable asset to our 
Senior Class. A domestic person at 
heart, Bob hopes to settle down after 
the war and live happily. 

Football I, II, III. 

Senior Dance Committee. 

Mirror Room Agent I, II, III. 





TEMPLE, JUNE 

Special Course 

June wants to graduate from Lasell 
Junior College and later visit Europe. 
Continually on the go, June has many 
friends who like her good nature and 
vivacity. 

Orchestra II, III, IV. 



THOMAS, ELEANOR 

Stenographic Course 

Eleanor is one of the better-known 
members of 105. This blonde senior 
has the personality and appearance to 
maRe her outstanding in any gathering. 
She enjoys dancing, good times, and 
making friends. The future looks 
bright for Eleanor. 






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9 






THOMPSON. RUTH VIRGINIA 

Clerical Course 

Ruthie is always ready for a good 
time, such as spending summers .it 
Long Lake and going out with E. B. 
She has the necessary smile for every- 
one and with this asset should make .1 
real success as a secretary. Our best 
wishes go with her. 

Honor Roll II. 

Sophomore Social Committee. 

Class Day Usher. 



IOMAO, ELEANOR L. 

Stenographic Course 

"El," that popular miss known far 
and wide as "Frankie,'' is forever bat- 
tling single handed in defense of "The 
Voice." She craves hot dogs, onions, 
and home-made apple pie. She wants 
to be a writer, get rich in a hurry, 
and sleep forever after. "El" insists 
that bookkeeping is the reason she 
can't stop biting her fingernails. 

Class Prophecy. 

Junior and Senior Nominating Com- 
mittee. 

Literary Staff of Mirror. 





TOTORA, ANN MARIE 

Clerical Course 

Good natured Jinx is the original 
"Pistol-packin' Mamma." She likes 
hunting, and would also like to have 
a good collection 6T all kinds of guns 
some day. Jinx is patient, especially 
when explaining to Miss Mankouich 
where "those lost slips" are. Our best 
wishes are with her in her profession 
of career girl. 



TOWNSEND. A. VICTORIA 

Business Machines Course 

Vicky's many likes denote her as a 
girl of a pleasing personality. She 
can always be seen with Adele, with 
whom she hopes to join the WAVES, 
a desire of so manv of her feminize 
classmates. If she does, her desire t<> 
visit China will probably be fulfilled. 

Football Usher. 

Graduation Usher. 





TUMMINELLI. ROSE LOUISE 

( ol lege Preparatory Course 

Rose likes good music (not jazz), 
sports, and most of all that boy in the 
Navy. Her ambition is to be successful 
in whatever she undertakes, and 
whether it is nursing or something 
else, her sincerity and sympathetic feel- 
ing toward others is certain to make 
her realize this ambition. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 

Basketball II. 

Hockey II. 

Archery II. 

Bowling III, IV. 



TURNER. HAROLD RALPH 

Accounting Course 

Blushing when a certain girl's name 
is mentioned is Harold's weakness. 
His ambition is to be credit manager 
at Potter Press, possibly because his 
credit is so good with all his friends. 





TWOMEY. GEORGE JOSEPH 
Business Accounting Course 
"Take it away, I'll buy War 
Bonds" says Big George whose ambi- 
tion is to become the mayor of Wav- 
erly. He's always on time when Bob 
Hope or the 920 Club is on the air 
and he likes to have the last word 
when arguing with Richard Wanburg. 
Inquisitive people and homework do 
not agree with George, but strawberry 
sodas hit the spot. 



VELLANTE, DELIA C. 

Stenographic Course 

This petite bundle of dynamite, 
otherwise known as "Minnie Pearl," 
dislikes anyone who doesn't like 
"Frankie. Her favorite expression is 
'"Really," ("veddy" English, you 
know!), and her ambition is to be a 
private secretary to a rich man. She's 
"mad" about coffee milk shakes, and. 
because of her delightful sense of 
humor, gets along well with everyone. 

Dramatic Club. 

D. U. Club. 

Usher at Graduation '44. 

Red Cross Representative. 

Honor Roll I. 





VILES, BETTY 

College Preparatory Course 

Betty's ambition is to live according 
to Untermeyer's "Prayer" and Kip- 
ling's "If." Exams in 308 are defi- 
nitely disliked by her, but she likes 
Mr. Hodge, and nis apples, and Man- 
omet, and she admires Mr. Ward. 
Loads of luck to you, Betty, your 
friendliness and cheerfulness is cer- 
tain to make you successful. 

Class Historian. 

Secretary-Treasurer of Senior Class. 

Honor Roll II. Ill, IV. 

Assistant Editor of "Mirror" II, III. 

Bowling IV. 

Dramatic Club. 



VINCELLO. VIRGINIA B. 

College Preparatory Course 

"Ginny" likes interesting people 
and mail, but definitely dislikes any- 
one who thinks she is too small to do 
anything. She hopes, after college, to 
become a teacher, and her smile and 
sunny disposition should make her a 
very charming one. 

Junior Nominating Committee. 

Senior Nominating Committee. 

Dramatic Club. 

Bowling IV, 



WAGNER, JOSEPH 

Clerical Course 

Joe is one of the boys of 112. He 
can always be found at the football 
games cheering on the boys with 
plenty of confetti. Joe and Don were 
quite the pair until Don left in Feb- 
ruary, but since then Joe has awaited 
his call to service. Best of luck to a 
good-natured civilian. 



WALDMAN. ADELE 

Business Machines Course 

To join the WAVES is Adele's am- 
bition. With her bright smile, we 
know she will make as many friends 
outside of school as she has here. 
Good luck in the WAVES, Adele. 

Honor Roll 1943. 

Secretary of Advertising Staff of 
"Mirror." 





WALDRON, CATHERINE MARIE 

Practical Arts Course 

Kay and Peggy plan to merge tal- 
ents and open up their own tea room. 
This adventure should work out mar- 
velously, for Kay has the winning 
personality, a requisite for success. 
Kay also plans to join the WAVES 
and see the world, and also to be 
nearer that certain boy in the Navy. 



WALSH, FLORENCE T. 

Business Machines Course 

Florence's good sense of humor will 
be an important asset in helping her 
to make a success in the WAVES. 
After getting out, Florence hopes to 
become a roller-skating champion, 
and her friends know she has the 
ability. Loads of luck to her. 







^J 




WANBERG. RICHARD EDWARD 

Accounting Course 

"Richy" has his hands full trying 
to get Pete to hurry up. "Richy," 
however, gets his vitality by taking 
things easily in 311. He is in a fix ; 
his desire is to be anything but an 
accountant. 



WASHBURN, JEAN 

Stenographic Course 

There's nothing pretentious about 
this pert senior, who is one of those 
girls who does every little job and 
says nothing, but who is of the type 
that everyone likes. Sh,e is sure to 
make her mark in the world. 

Archery. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 

Bowling. 




*^ # 






AM 




WEAGLE. RUTH E. 

Stenographic Course 

Ruthie's greatest pleasure is writing 
to G. G. (could it be love?) She 
enjoys swimming, dancing, driving, 
and lemon cokes. Some day she wants 
to live in California, but until then 
she hopes to be a successful secretary. 

Advertising Staff of Mirror. 

Cafeteria Worker. 



WEATHERBEE, PAUL LAWRENCE 

Accounting Course 

Paul, also known as "Heron," 
whose ambition is to become an au- 
tomobile salesman, just can't stand 
girls with no self-control and uncoop- 
erative women. He never stands wo- 
men up nor leaves them alone. He 
enjoys listening to Bing Crosby and 
cowboy music. After the war Paul 
and Bob are going to make a cross- 
country trip and return married. 





WEBSTER, DOROTHY ANN 

Stenographic Course 

If you see a certain blonde, who is 
five feet two, stumble upstairs or 
down, you'll know it's "Dot." She 
loves spaghetti and mocha frappes. 
Her worst fault is borrowing money, 
but what's a nickel among friends? 
When, after a heated discussion, you 
hear, "Well, all right," ring in your 
ear, she's probably angry. If Harry 
James and his orchestra are playing "I 
Dream of You," and the Navy is 
close at hand. Dot is happy. 

Honor Roll II. 



WELLCOME, H. BARDEN 

Special Course 

To be a success in something, pre- 
ferably ranching, is the ambition 
"Tex" hopes to fullfill in life. He 
enjoys horses, fancy leather work 
(which anyone can easily see by those 
fancy cowboy boots he wears) shoot- 
ing, and hockey; but cares little for 
people who show off and teachers who 
show too much authority. 
IV. 

"Mirror" Art Department Editor 







WELLINGTON, DAVID 

WORCESTER 

Technical Course. 

When you hear that expression, 
"Got a library slip?" then you know 
it's that ambitious lad, who is noted 
for his gentlemanly conduct and hon- 
esty, "Dave," known as "Wilbur " to 
his IV B friends. He likes study- 
periods and vacations, and intends to 
to to M. I. T. When this college 
has David, it will surely have an 
honor student. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 
Vice-President of IV B Club. 



WELLINGTON, EDITH ESTELLE 

Accounting Course 

Edie is another girl who is always 
on time. Her reserved character and 
friendly ways have won her many ad- 
mirers. Her ambition is a noble one, 
to succeed in life. Sports are first rate 
with her, especially archery and bowl- 
ing. 

Archery III. 

Bowling. 





WENCKUS, ALEXANDER FRAN' Is 

Stenographic Course 

"Wink" is one of the best-liked 
boys in his claw He enjoys being a 
gentleman of leisure and darning with 
J. G. His ambition is to join the 
Army Air Corps. With his person- 
ality, we know he will make a fine 
pilot. Keep 'em smiling, "Wink." 

Football IV. 

Honor Roll II. III. 

Sophomore Social Committee. 

Senior Danic Committee. 

Mirror Staff II, III, IV, (Bus Mgr. I 

( lass President IV. 



WESSELL, MARJORIE EVELYN 

Practical Arts Course 

Margie gets along with everyone ; 
that's why she's one of the most pop- 
ular of the crowd. Roller skating, 
skiing, and traveling occupy her time. 
She plans to join the WAVES, and. 
as everyone knows, she is sure to make 
a good one. 





WHALEN, BERNADETTE RUTH 

Stenographic (Durst 

"Bernic is a lover of dancing and 
swing music. She is one of those 
woman drivers, and her pet dream is 
to own a beautiful Buick. A certain 
Bob occupies most of her time, to- 
gether with Harry James and Vaughn 
Munroc. She and L. P. have 
quired the title of "the inseparables." 
Let the world see your flowing hair 
and sparkling smile, Bernie, and we 
think you will be a model. 

Honor Roll II, III. 



W ILLS, SUSAN D. 

Stenographic Course 

Sue's ambition is to become cither a 
stenographer or a model. Dancing, 
skating, and swimming are tops with 
her. Her favorite song is "Moonlight 
Serenade," by Glenn Miller. Her ap- 
petite is well known to everyone. But 
after all, she is live feet, nine and a 
half inches tall, and needs a lot of 
nourishment. Don't let it get you 
down. Sue. when you get that model's 
position. 

Honor Roll I. II. 





WILSON, BETTY LOUISE 

College Course 

"Bet" is the tall senior with the 
winsome smile and pretty brown hair. 
To graduate from Boston University is 
her ambition, and we all wish her suc- 
cess. 

Honor Roll II. III. 

Dramatic Club. 

Bowling IV. 



WILSON, FRED STANLEY 

Practical Arts Course 

Freddy spends all day Sunday in 
Weston with Betty, and the rest of the 
time talking about her to his friends. 
His ambition at the present time is to 
join the Navy and be stationed aboard 
aircraft carrier, and after the war to 
learn a good trade and settle down. 

Senior Nominating Committee. 

Honor Roll. 

Mirror Room Agent. 




WOLK, MARILYN 

College Course 

Everybody in 117 admires Marilyn 
for her exceptional brains and ability. 
She is a girl of the reserved type and 
tackles every obstacle with quiet de- 
termination but with exceptional re- 
sults. A good future seems in store 
for her. 



WOOD. RITA K 

Stenographic Course 

Being thoughtful is "Rees's" best 
virtue. She loathes waiting for peo- 
ple. (What people, thought "I 
don't like boys," she often remarks, 
but who believes that? She wants to 
sing with a band some day. but she 
is busy at present deciding between the 
bluejacket and a former W. H. S. 
graduate. 

Dramatic Club. 



WOODBURY, FRANK ALLEN 

Clerical Course 

Woody likes to attend the physics 
lectures in Room 312 and also to par- 
ticipate in all types of sports. The 
United States Army Air Corps will 
claim him soon, but afterwards he 
plans to buy a new convertible. 



WOODS, BARBARA 

Practical Arts Course 

"Woodsy" would like to travel 
around the world with a certain per- 
son called E — . Our Army, Bing 
Crosby, and Kay Kyser are her favor- 
ites. Getting up early and Frank Sin- 
atra don't agree with her. All of 
you that know "Woodsy" will find 
that she is good-natured and happy- 
go-lucky. 







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WOOLNER, BEVERLY M. 

Stenographic Course 

"Bev" can usually be seen dashing 
about madly to get "The Column" in. 
After school she can be found at 
"Docs", drinking frappes as fast as 
they are made. Going to "Tote" 
makes her week complete. Her peak 
will be reached when she becomes a 
medical secretary. "Oh, Judge" will 
tell you she's disatisfied. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 

Co-editor of News-Tribune Column. 

Junior Prom Committee. 



YAMARTINO, RAYMOND LOUIS 

Technical Course 

Like the rest of the "Tech Boys" 
"Yamie" is very ambitious. He hopes 
to see the world and become a thous- 
andaire. With his scholastic achieve- 
ments, we know that he's off to a 
good start. "Are you serious, Jock- 
ey?" are words which he often utters, 
always with a smile. 

Honor Roll II, III, IV. 

Senior Dance Committee. 

Junior Nominating Committee. 

Mirror Room Agent. 

IV B Club. 





YAROSSI, PAULINE R. 

Stenographic Course 

If you hear someone yelling, "Hey, 
Mary, wait for me," that's Polly. She 
plans to buy a car and travel all over 
the United States, including California. 
Keeping scrapbrooks of sports of all 
kinds are tops with her. She likes 
ending a day at the Shore Drug Com- 
pany and listening to Artie Shaw's 
"Bill." Polly takes week-end visits to 
Marlboro ( — wonder what the main at- 
traction is?) 

Honor Roll I. 



ZAMMUTO, JOSEPH JOHN 

Practical Arts Course 

Joe's only weakness is not being 
able to converse with the opposite sex, 
but he makes up for this by being care- 
ful and meticulous in everything he 
does. Joe's destination is the Navy 
where he plans to spend twenty years 
and then retire to Alaska on a pen- 
sion. 





COMEAU, NORMA ROSALYN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Norm' is the little miss who likes 
nothing better than a thrilling football 
game and Bing Crosby. If you have 
any conceit in your make-up, you aren't 
one of her friends. Her spare mo- 
ments are spent entertaining at U.S.O. 
camps. Her peak will be reached when 
she becomes an air hostess. 



McNAMARA, JOHN THOMAS 

Stenographic Course 

"Red Mac's" immediate ambition 
is to see the world while wearing 
Navy blue. Give him a blonde, 
frappes, and plenty of sleep and 
everything will De fine. Work, silly 
girls, and flat tires do little to inspire 
him while keeping Winky out ot 
trouble and lending money help make 
him the "fine lad" he is. 

Business Staff of Mirror IV. 



EBERHARD. JEAN DOUGLAS 

South Junior Alumni. 

Technical Course 

Jean is one of those girls who 
doesn't lug home any books and still 
manages to come out with all A's. She 
enjoys Mr. Ward's English class, 
dancing, and receiving letters (especial- 
ly from the Navy). Her ambition is to 
graduate from Wheaton College, which 
she is certain to do with her usual 
"flying colors." 

Honor Roll II, III, IV ; Junior 
Nominating Committee; Advertising 
staff and alumni editor of "Minor" ; 
Honorary mention in Franklin medal; 
Dramatic Club; Basketball II, IV; 
Bowling II. 



TROMBLEY, JUNE MARJORIE 

Accounting Course 

June keeps her promises. "Are you 
kiddin'?" she says whenever anyone 
hands her a tomato, one "genus 
fruitus," which she despises. She 
likes to spend her time with Bill, but 
dislikes homework and conceited girls. 



HART. RICHARD DANIEL 

Teachers' College Course 

Dick aspires to become as good a 
teacher as Mr. Hodge, and his friend- 
ly personality provides him with a 
solid foundation. A certain senior 
girl, however, is taking most of his 
spare time when he isn't practicing on 
the piano or indulging in his favorite 
pastime, eating hot fudge sundaes. 

Honor Roll II, IV. 

Cheer Leader III, IV. 

Mirror Advertising Staff. 



McSHANE, BARBARA JEAN 
Business Accounting Course 
Barb likes listening to the 9:20 
Club. Bing Crosby's singing and Lux 
Radio Theatre, but she dislikes con- 
ceited people and getting up in the 
morning. She plans to become a suc- 
cess in the business world, a sure thing 
for a girl who is always on time. 



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CLASS DAY SPEAKERS 
Left to right: Eleanor Tomao, Prophet; Bety Viles, Historian; 
Janice Myers, Writer of Class Will. 




SENIOR NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Seated: Virginia Vincello, Margaret Chiasson, Eleanor Tomao. 
Standing: George McElhiney, Chairman; Fred Wilson; Harold 
Bowman ; Andry Kokidko. 




SENIOR DANCE COMMITTEE 

Seated: Phyllis LeShane, Louise Owen, June Geisler, Selma Kauf- 
man. 

Standing:, Russell Kelly, Chairman; James Fenelley, Harold Clark, 
Elliott Hansen, Donald MacLean, Raymond Yamartino. 




Seen at the Senior Dance 









THE MIRROR STAFF 

First Row: Elaine Lindstrom, Barbara Hoooer, Lois Coolidge, Betty Viles, Barden Wellcome Art 

Editor; Alexander Wenckus, Business Manager; Nancy Newcomb, Carolyn Noyes, Barbara 

French, Art Editor; Betty Beckett. 
Second Row: James Davin-, David Law, Isabel Hapootlian, Eleanor Toman, Adele Waldm.in, Sylvia 

Griff, Sherlie Babb, Norma Read, Albert Stiefel, Neil Nix. 
Third Row: Eleanor Thomas, Gild i Palumbo, Eileen Hatfield, Virginia Oliveri, Eleanor Wills, 

Marilyn Gowell, Elizabeth Jackson, Charlotte Leavy. 
Fourth Row: Amelia Cardillo, Virginia Johncon, June Kelley, Fay Wenckus, Jane Flagg, Joan 

Morang, Flora Gray. 
Last Row: Mr. Hood, Faculty Business Manager; Robert Rier, Richard Hart, Robert Sivewright. 



r 



i \ 



Class Prophecy 



i^HEtime is 1950 and the 
place Waltham. It is a beau- 
tiful Sunday in June. A large 
crowd has gathered around 
the speakers' platform on the 
Common. The Waltham 
Senior High School Band, 
still under the supervision of 
Mr. Crawford, makes merry 
with music. It is a gala occa- 
sion which brings these peo- 
ple together. I am supposed- 
ly one of Waltham's favorite 
daughters returning home 
after becoming one of the 
most famous writers of all 
time. 

I am traveling by Pullman, 
with Sue Di Lorenzo, my secretary. As the train 
slows down, I gaze out of the window and am sur- 
prised to see banners waving, and a "welcome 
home" sign stretched across Moody Street. Yes, 
Waltham is still my favorite place although there 
are a few noticeable changes. 

For one thing, instead of the extremely distin- 
guished mayor of five years ago, I see a very fa- 
miliar face. It looks like — but I can't be sure — 
yes, it is — Bob Rier. 

Well, the train has come to a standstill, and we 
get off. As we walk to the platform, my eyes 
search for more familiar faces. After we are 
seated, I am presented with a key to the city by 
Mayor Rier who then goes on to recite the history 
of Waltham. 

Standing in the audience are Dottie Webster 
with her Paul (and all the little Paul's) and Ruthie 
Weagle with Gig. It looks as if the whole police 
force is here, and officers Peter Gonsalves, Joe 
Wagner, George Gardiner, Paul Gordon, and Rus- 
sell Annis are probably having a busy time watch- 
ing that no pockets are picked. 




finishes his speech. He gives 
me a three- day tour of the 
highlights in Waltham, all 
expenses paid, and Andry 
Kokidko as explanatory 
guide. (Who could ask for 
anything more!) 

Since time marches on and 
we march with it, the pro- 
gram goes on with a song and 
dance by Delia Vellante, Pres- 
ident of the 15 th Chapter, 
Club Number 72, of the 
"We'd - Lay - Down - Our - 
Lives - And - Die - For - 
Frankie - Sinatra Fan Club." 
The present enrollment is 547 
and many of 45 's graduates 



I heave a sigh of relief when the Mayor finally 



ELEANOR TOMAO 

Writer of Class Prophecy 

hold important positions in that association. Adele 
Waldman, Josephine Ravesi, Sue Niosi, Bea Cal- 
usdian, Barbara McShane, Angelina Alesse, and 
Flo Walsh are but a few. Delia tells me there are 
as many boys as girls in this club, but for fear of 
being exposed, they refuse to reveal their names. 
However, I have it on the best authority that John 
Elander is the most active member much to the 
disappointment of Paul Weatherbee, who broods 
alone in a corner, bites his fingernails, tears his 
hair, and threatens to go outside and eat worms. 

Following Delia's number, short speeches are 
given by presidents of various organizations in- 
cluding Jean Hodgson, founder of the "School of 
Mercy" — a haven of rest for all those poor unfor- 
tunates constantly hounded and tortured into 
physical as well as mental wrecks by taking such 
subjects as algebra, typing, bookkeeping, and the 
like. 

Richard Clark, Editor of The News Tribune, 
is sitting on the platform observing all and saying 
nothing, while the copyright girls, Mary Arrigo, 
Sylvia Griff, Anne Delaney, Barbara Farrell, Mar- 
ion Cantwell, and Ginny Oliveri take notes. 




Bill Schultheis, head of the Shell Oil Company, 
and his secretary, Pauline Cormier, were among 
the notables present. Bill comments on the fact 
that there is an over-abundance of gasoline that 
people are not buying these days. The Shell has 
rio use for it and can't even give it away since 
Walter Hawley discovered a new and cheaper form 
of motor power which anyone can make by com- 
bining turnip juice, mashed charcoal, and white 
of egg. 

Next in the line of entertainment is a song and 
"Bahce by Jeanne Casey, followed by Waltham's 
own Swooner Crooner, Don Kingsley. We soon 
realize that night is approaching, so the chairman 
of the board of entertainers, Russ Kelly, states 
briefly that the program is over. My secretary and 
"I will spend our first night at the Swank Hotel, 
overlooking the Charles River. 

We start for the hotel in a taxi run by Harold 
•Bowman and Weldon Hitchcock. Two drivers 
for this taxi are an absolute necessity, because, as 
Harold steers, Weldon pushes from the rear. 

We have to make a forced stop at Frank Wood- 
bury's Gas Station, and there we renew acquain- 
tance with the attendant, Anna May Monks. 

In record time we reach the hotel and are met 
by three people — each claiming ownership of the 
hotel — Paul Brady, Carl Leaf, and Huntley Tas- 
ker. They have been fighting over this place for 
nearly five years and still haven't reached a deci- 
sion as to who owns it. Paul hires them and Carl 
fires them, while Huntley just takes life easily 
and makes passes at the pretty waitresses and bell- 
hops, Eileen Hatfield, Rita Curtin, Peggy Ahern, 
Ruth Christiansen, Rose Giardina, Virginia Vin- 
cello, and Rita McCann. Carl gives us our room 
number, and tells us it is the best room in the ho- 
tel; but when we see it, we decide it must be the 
next best. 

We fall asleep but are soon awakened by a 
train racing past and then by the sound of hoof- 
beats. I run to the window and through the dark- 
ness, I make out the figure of Yolanda Dellepigne, 
riding by on her horse. 

In the morning, breakfast is served at 7:30, and 
cooks, Betty Cronin and Donald Hartnett, pro- 



duce a delicious meal. All the guests of the hotel 
arc seated at a long table, and I notice Blanche 
Barbanti, Margie Kerins, Arlene Demaris, Marion 
Berry, Renee Gould, Theresa Casella, Barbara 
Griff, Phyllis LeShane (who got up at six to wait 
for the mailman), and Mary Ridenti. They are 
all here for the grand opening of the Moody 
Street Harbor, during which ceremony a new ship, 
"The Alexander'' will be christened. It is named 
after Alexander Wenckus, Waltham's richest and 
most prominent citizen. 

Later, according to our schedule, we meet "Ko 
kie" and take a sightseeing tour through the high 
spots. The bus driver is Pat Fitzgerald, who is in 
a bad mood because little Bud Roberts, son of 
Jean Dermott Roberts, has pulled down the chintz 
curtains lining the bus windows. "After all, cur- 
tains are hard to iron," says Pat. 

The other passengers are Corinne Robertson, 
Esther Dugas, Evelyn Foote, Millie Hayden, Mar- 
ion Kezer, Barbara Hapenny and Sy, Anna Sabetti, 
Rose Gncotta, Catherine Waldron, Barbara Geof- 
frian, James Feneley, and Margie Jones with Bill. 

As we pass Senior High, Kokie points out that 
Richard Wanberg is the new dietitian in the Cafe, 
|une Kelly has taken over Mr. Mitchell's law 
classes, and Nancy Newcomb has full charge of 
the Dramatic Club. 

We ride on down Lexington Street and stop at 
the Police Station. It is going to be rebuilt, and 
"Honest John" MacNamara is laying the corner- 
stone. As soon as he does that, he is ushered back 
into his cell by Special Investigator Eddie Bowler, 
who then locks the cell and throws the key away. 

As we pass City Hall, we see Barbara MacDon- 
ald, Virginia Morreale, Arlene MacGuinness, 
Mary Maffei, and Ruth Thompson, the office girls, 
cross the street for a drop of tea at Pintabone and 
Whalen's Coffee Shop. 

We ride down Moody Street, stop at the bridge 
to pay a toll to Donald Potter, the officer in 
charge, and then continue on our merry way. 

We pass Cronin's which now occupies two 
blocks and is still expanding. Paul Joyce is the 
head man in charge of all the models. His bevy 
of beauties consists of Lois Deacon, Jean Langill, 



Gloria Monteiro, Sue Wills, Carolyn No}es, Adele 
Koundakjian, Betty Wilson, Rose Giminarda, 
Elaine Ramsdell, June Temple, and Selma Kauf- 
man — now that's "one man's family!" 

We pass Eleanor Morreale's Restaurant, where 
Angie Mobilia is in charge of the waitresses, Bar- 
bara MacCarthy, Betty McNeil, Alice Connors, 
and Margie Wessell. 

As we start back, we see Don Clarke's Escort 
Bureau — ladies, do you need an escort? Do you 
want a' man who is tall, dark, and handsome? 
You do? Well, who doesn't! Clarke's Escort 
Bureau is well established though. Just recently, 
Don escorted "John's Other Wife." 

We soon realize we are quite tired so we ride 
back to our hotel where we have our dinner, and 
soon fall asleep. 

On Tuesday, we attend the christening of the 
new ship. There is a large crowd there, includ- 
ing many newspaper reporters from the Tribune: 
namely, Bill Furdon, Barden Wellcome, Allen 
Hamney, Harold Turner, and Dave Wellington. 
The photographers, Nick Palumbo and Al Beni- 
nati, are busy taking snaps of the celebrities pres- 
ent. Barbara French, commercial artist for the 
paper, is drawing a sketch of the ship before June 
Geisler, a very dear friend of Mr. Wenckus, breaks 
the bottle of champagne, christens the ship "The 
Alexander", and sends it rolling down the runway. 

After this affair, there are special busses operat- 
ing to carry the many people to the Hovey Memo- 
rial, where a banquet will be held. George Lu- 
pien, Lawrence Foote, Dave Hartman, Edward 
Gerritson, and Warren Judkins cheerfully make 
many trips with their busses so that all the people 
get to the hall. 

On arrival, we find the music is playing, people 
are singing, and, in short, everyone is happy. A 
brief skit entitled, "Home Sweet Home" or 
"Cedarwood, We Love You" is enacted by Louise 
Owen, Arlene Roche, and Joane Rand. When 
the applause dies down, Neil Nix dances, while 
in the background the chorus girls, Margaret 



Chiasson, Carmela Alterisio, Jean Porter, Antoin- 
ette Ferrara, Margie Swanberg, and Ann Totora 
sing a popular tune. 

Robert Guba, Ray Morse, and Harvey Ruggles, 
self-appointed ushers, pass out programs. Ray 
Yamartino is in charge of soft drinks. His favor- 
ite one is a mixture of Seven-Up, Ginger Ale, 
Sasparilla, Root Beer, and Iced Tea. Who will 
have to wear an ice bag on his head for the rest of 
the week? 

Before the lights are lowered for a song by Al- 
bert Stiefel, Lorraine Cousins, and Betty Beckett, 
I see seated in a far off corner, Eleanor Thomas, 
Jean Washburn, Lois Kilpatrick, Pauline Yarossi, 
Rita Wood, and Agnes LeBlanc, talking with 
Hollywood's Newest Sensation, Jack Manning — 
here on a personal appearance tour with his press 
agent, Mike Chagnon. 

Suddenly the spotlight is centered on the en- 
trance, and Howard Bettinson, Master of Cere- 
monies, announces the arrival of Bev Woolner, 
editor of a nationally known woman's magazine; 
Janice Myers, rival editor of another nationally 
known woman's magazine; Barbara Pearson, one 
of the most talked of women in America; Isabel 
Haipootlian, Arline Simmons, and Betty Viles, 
Einstein's three prodigies ; and Jill Palumbo with 
her secretary, Grace Nethercote. Jill is a famous 
dress designer. She is wearing her latest creation 
— an ankle length fuschia skirt, an orange jersey 
blouse, and striped green elbow gloves, all topped 
off with a yellow turban and silver slippers. Very 
stunning, but I must wear my glasses from now 
on. And now, all of a sudden, I see Vic Town- 
send, Marilyn Leach, Muriel McCann, Florence 
Raymond, Ida DellaCamera, Charlene Gesner, and 
Donald Caswell ! They are all walking toward 
me with wicked gleams in their eyes. What's 
wrong! What have I done? — but I'll never know 
because I find myself sitting up in bed, and in the 
middle of the night too ! What a nightmare — but 
it was fun! 

Eleanor Tomao, '45 




Class History 



JK&AIN dripped mockingly 
on the billowy whiteness of 
Doodle's cloud. Heaven cer- 
tainly could be depressing at 
times. She stretched her 
arched neck, and, leaning 
downward, tilted her head to 
the side; her long wavy hair 
caught among the strings of 
her harp, but her only thought 
was to discover who was on 
duty above her. "Dipsy 



again 



! Hm — she seems to be 



enjoying herself, bursting the 
rain clouds on her." Again 
she grumbled. "You'd think 
they'd go easy on the new- 
comers; after all, she had 
only swiped her fifth ride on a helicopter. Why 
shouldn't she accept rides from strangers when 
they didn't even know there was a Doodle Sim- 
mons in Heaven or stealing rides on merry-go- 
rounds! Besides, it was fun!" 

Doodle heaved a sigh; if only she had waited 
and been born in 2027 instead of 1927 and could 
be living on earth rather than in Heaven, in 2045. 

Suddenly a heavy thud sent her headlong into 
her cloud. Two minutes later Doodle's head 
peeped slowly from the cloudburst. "Mr. Mor- 
ang, have you no respect for the fairer sex?" 

Mr. Morang batted two eyelashes. "I really 
didn't see you this time, Arlene, as I was testing 
the amount of hydrogen in the new cloud that I 
received for good behavior, and I forgot to look 
where I was going." 

Doodle looked at him suspiciously, and batted 
five eyelashes. "Well, please be kind enough to 
tow me home then." 

Reluctantly Mr. Morang put his test tube behind 
his right ear and tossed Doodle a rope of protons. 
Happily the two glided onto the plains of Heaven. 

The next morning Doodle rose early and quick - 




BETTY VILES 
Writer of Class History 



ly walked to the celestial lib 
rary. The sun shone bright- 
ly, and she was quick to no- 
tice a bevy of people gathered 
about two men. Silently she 
made her way to an impres- 
sive figure on the outskirts of 
the crowd. He turned sud- 
denly, and, much to her 
amazement, Doodle found 
herself in the arms of her for- 
mer English teacher, George 
Ward. "Why, Mr. Ward! 
you haven't changed a bit, 
have you? Where have you 
been keeping yourself? Oops! 
Sorry, that's your line — " 
"Let me tell you the great 
news," retorted Mr. Ward, releasing her from his 
grasp. "Mr. Lionel M. Mosher is about to return 
to W. H. S. !" he continued in a vehement tone. 
"He's forgotten the ending of one of his great 
novels, and is dropping down in a cloud of invisi- 
bility to brouse through his books for the ending 
in the library of W. H. S. I intended to accom- 
pany him on his journey, but as I was sneaking be- 
tween the layers of Mr. Mosher's cloud, George 
Washington spied me, and, as a result, I shall have 
no halo until Mr. Mosher returns." 

Doodle chuckled. "Do you suppose we might 
watch his departure from the Pearly Gates?" she 
inquired. 

At that time Bob Rier soared past with Carolyn 
Noyes, apparently headed for the Pearly Gates. 
Mr. Ward and Doodle followed and reached the 
top of the Gates when St. Peter and Miss Allen ar- 
rived for their passes. Doodle presented hers to 
St. Peter while Mr. Ward fumbled hopefully 
through his sandals. 

"Evidently I've lost it," he remarked in disgust. 
"Consequently you remain here until you find 
it," remarked St. Peter. 



Mr. Ward groaned. "Oh, my jangled nerves!" 
he sputtered. 

When at last he had rescued his thumb f:o:r. 
the knot in his sandals, he realized that Booth 
Tarkington was presenting Mr. Mosher with a 
map, compass, and a list of things to bring back. 

Doodle squinted through her telescope to see 
what was on the list. Mr. Reynold's name was 
first — the two pictures previously in 04. Miss Dar- 
medy's was next — she wished Mr. Mosher to leave 
a note for Miss Hart to stop taking those vitamin 
pills she had devised, and to come up and join 
her, or else she'd be teaching history rather than 
German till the end of the world. The list went 
on: Harold Clark, one broken heart; Margie 
Jones, megaphone; Dick Clark, the latest Popular 
Science magazine. 

Putting the list in his pocket, Mr. Mosher gin- 
gerly stepped on his cloud and waved good-bye. 
Doodle watched till he was out of sight, and then 
cheerfully left Mr. Ward and St. Peter and went 
back to bed. 

Twenty-four hours later, Mr. Ward was still 
perched on the Pearly Gates when Mr. Mosher 
entered Heaven for a second time. Quickly he 
told what he had discovered. 

Waltham Senior High School, the Second, had 
been founded on Prospect Hill. Good old W. H. 
S. was now a symbol of great learning, and con- 
tained the literature of all its great authors and 
the statues of all its great teachers. "An amazing 
likeness of Mr. Ward holding L' Allegro in one 
hand and a bag of potato chips in the other is 
standing at the end of the main corridor," he re- 
marked. "I managed to get most of the material 
except Miss Hart's, who has released her pills 
for public use." Looking oyer what Mr. Mosher 
had brought back, Dick Clark suddenly burst out 
with a groan, and held up a memorable copy of 
the Mirror, marked Class of '45. "Do you call 
this Popular Science?" he squealed. "That was a 
mistake," chuckled Mr. Mosher. "What does it 
say?" 

"Let's see," went on Dick; "it starts out with 
the Mirror staff. Ha! I was Editor. Oh, I re- 
member now ; over a hundred years ago, I entered 



in September, 1941, a mere Freshman. There 
were only eighty of us: Effie Bohannon was Presi- 
dent, Roy Arbuthnot, Vice-President; Betty Viles, 
Secretary-treasurer; and Marge Jones, Auditor. 
That May we had our first social, and came out 
four dollars to the good. As sophomores, the 
Class of '45 piled into the corridors of W. H. S. 
with Bob Driscoll, President; Bill Power, Vice-. 
President; June Kelly, Secretary-Treasurer; and 
Carolyn Noyes, Auditor. Barbara Pearson did a 
wonderful job of handling the Sophomore Social 
that year, and a number of the students helped out 
with entertainment as they had done the previous 
year. In June Miss Helen Ober retired, but is still 
remembered by all who were fortunate enough to 
have her as teacher or friend. 

In the fall of 1943 John Furdon was killed in 
combat while serving God and country in World 
War II. Since then, forty names have been added 
to the list of valiant fighting men from Waltham 
High who have given their lives in the service of 
their Home Land. 

In September, 1943, the doors of W. H. S. 
again swung open, and the class of '45 began its 
junior year with increased vigor and spirit. 
Again Bob Driscoll led his class as President, fol- 
lowed by Barbara Pearson as Vice-President, June 
Kelly as Secretary-Treasurer, and John Rooney, as 
Auditor. Everyone was overcome with pride and 
joy at our victorious football team, through which 
we won the Eastern State Championship, Class A ; 
and our victorious basketball team, through which 
we entered the Tech Tournament. On May 25, 
1944, our Junior Prom was held. I was chairman 
of the committee, but nevertheless all went well ; 
the gym was decorated to perfection, and the 
weather was beautiful. Everyone had a wonderful 
time, and our first formal was a success in every 
way. 

Practically all worked during the summer of '44. 
There were many jobs to be filled, and the high- 
schoolers helped out in stores, farms, and fac- 
tories. 

September 6, 1944, was a notable day in the 
history of the Class of '45. Each day that fol- 
lowed brought us closer *x> the end of our school 




years, then we realized for the first time that we 
were about to be on our own, soon to be groping 
blindly through the corridors of experience and 
self-determination. Many senior boys left for the 
service during our last year; we were proud of 
them all and admired their spirit and sacrifice. 
The officers elected in our senior year were Presi- 
dent, Alex. Wenckus; Vice-President, Barbara 
Pearson; Secretary-Treasurer, Betty Viles; and 
Auditor, Howard Bettinson. 

The Dramatic Club moved onward with Nancy 
Newcomb as President and Donald Kingsley as 
"The Voice". 

Waltham High started off to a great start in 
football, defeating Rindge Tech. 13-0. Eddie Bow- 
ler, burley center, Bill Furdon, left tackle, Ernie 
Finan, lanky end, and Nick Palumbo, handsome 
halfback, carried the Crimson throughout an ex- 
citing season of teamwork and muscles. Perhaps 
the most exciting game was Waltham at Everett 
with a 12-12 tie. The season was ended with a 
13-7 victory over our traditional Thanksgiving 
Day rival, Brockton, and then W. H. S. dove en- 
thusiastically into hockey and basketball. Not 



only did our team deserve praise but also our viva- 
cious cheerleaders; Marge Jones, Phil LeShane, 
Ruth Christiansen, Fay Wenckus, Bill Power, Dick 
Hart, and Walter Keyes. 

The Senior Dance was held on January 19, 1945, 
and thanks to Russel Kelly, as chairman, and 
everyone who devoted time and effort, it went over 
the top in every way. Many of the faculty were 
present; everyone enjoyed himself. 

Bev Woolner and Janice Myers kept everyone 
posted in "This Week at Waltham High". The 
Pennant Club made its debut under the able direc- 
tion of Mr. Mosher and Bob Rier. The Class of 
'45 found it had completed its task at Waltham 
High, and each member of it went forth on his 
own separate way with the motto, Respice Finem, 
a motto that had carried him and his friends 
through three years of teamwork. 

Doodle sighed, Miss Viets sniffed, and Mr. 
Mosher coughed. Suddenly a great thunderous 
voice was heard overhead, "Bravo — I've found my 
pass", shouted Mr. Ward from his lofty tempo- 
rary abode. And once again he stole the show. 

Betty Viles, '45 



FAREWELL 

It's difficult to say good-bye to someone who has 
been for many years a pillar of perplexing alge- 
braic formulae, a wizard of the unknown x, an ex- 
pounder of progressions, involution, homogeneous 
equations, functions, expansions, central tenden- 
cies, and what have you; and at the same time a 
man of impeccable character and earnest friendli- 
ness. 

For many years, the pupils of Waltham High 
have had algebra taught them by Mr. Reynolds, 
and now after fourteen years of outstanding ser- 
vice, he is leaving the portals of a school which is 
sorry to see him go. Mr. Reynolds will always be 
remembered for his excellent teaching, while his 
long record of outstanding service will be hard to 
equal. 



Class Will 



pKpE it remembered that we, 
the Class of 1945, being of 
sound and disposing mind 
and memory and wishing to 
direct in what manner our 
possessions shall be disposed 
of after our departure, do 
make and publish this, our 
last will and testament. After 
the payment of our just debts, 
we bequeath and devise as 
follows : 

To Mr. Ward, our best 
friend, and advisor, whose 
partiality towards Bing Cros- 
by has been causing feuds out 
in Hollywood, we leave a 
pair of platformed shoes, so 
that he may be as great as his many friends, not 
only in respect and admiration, but also in height. 

To Miss Clement, our "petite professeur," who 
has to bear listening to the slander of her favorite 
language daily, we leave a revised edition of "La 
Grammaire," entitled, "Learn French the Easy way 
with the Pupils of Waltham High," or "Get Hep! 
Learn English with a French accent." 

To Mr. Reynolds, the only teacher in the world 
who is threatening Bob Hope's career, we bestow 
a modern joke book, which ought to add to our 
beloved mathematician's gay ninety repetoire. 

To Mr. Jack-of-all-trades Morang, who for 
hours endeavors to seek the scientific cause of the 
average pupil's density or strange reactions, we 
leave the formula, "how to teach chemistry and 
maintain one's sanity." 

To Miss Viets, well-read, well-traveled, and 
extremely well-liked, whose tireless efforts have 
been a help in producing our fine yearbook, we 
leave an Editor-in-Chief who will prove equally as 
conscientious as Dick Clark. 

To Mr. Hodge, who is made to listen to a mul- 
titude of personal experiences and a€airs daily, 




JANICE G. MYERS 
Writer of Class Will 



and who has the best-fed 
classes in Waltham High, we 
leave a soon-to-be-completed 
volume on World War II. 

To the graduating class of 
"1946," one of the mildest in 
years, we leave the "Rules of 
Courtesy to Sophomores," 
some of which are: The cafe- 
teria is on the fourth floor; 
Room 307 is on the first floor; 
always ascend or descend any 
stairway; and eating in the 
corridors is permissible. 

We hereby nominate Mr. 
Mosher, Mr. Hood, and Miss 
Spencer, all of Waltham, 
County of Middlesex, and 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, as co-executors 
of this, our last will and testament. In testimony 
whereof we hereunto set our hand in the presence 
of three witnesses and declare this to be our last 
will this day of June in the year one thous- 
and, nine hundred and forty-five. 

Class of 1945 
By Janice Myers 



On this second day of June, A. D., 1945, Janice 
Myers for the Class of 1945 of Waltham, Massa- 
chusetts, signed the foregoing instrument in our 
presence, declaring it to be their last will; and 
thereafter as witnesses we three at their request, in 
their presence, and in the presence of each other, 
hereunto subscribed our names. 

Dorothy Mankowich 
Arline Darmedy 
Esther F. Mehring 




CODICIL TO THE LAST WILL AND 
TESTAMENT 

Be it remembered that we, the class of 19 n, 
being of sound and disposing mind and memory, 
and wishing to direct in what manner our estate 
shall be disposed of after our departure, do make 
and publish this, the codicil to our last will and 
testament, hereby ratifying and confirming said 
will in all respects except as changed by this in- 
strument. 

We hereby nominate and appoint Phyllis Le 
Shane executrix, of this, the codicil to our last will 
and testament, and we hereby request that she be 
exempt from furnishing any surety or sureties 01 
her official bond. 

To most studious and most likely to succeed 
Richard Clark, Editor-in-Chief of the "Mirror", 
and the tech course's contribution to Einstein's pro- 
tigees, we leave this "Book of Knowledge" so he 
may educate himself on the more simple things in 
life. 

To Delia Vellante, that human comedy, and one 
woman riot, who was unanimously chosen class 
wit, we leave a needle and a spool of thread so 
that she may always keep her acquaintances in 
stitches. 

To Lois Deacon, so poised, so sweet, and so very 
attractive, our Hollywood refugee whose ethereal 
charm has caused many sighs of envy, and many 
whistles of admiration, we leave a contract with 
one of the top modeling agencies in the country. 

To Gilda Palumbo, our most athletic and best 
dressed girl, we leave a personal garment which 
will really keep her ship-shape in the gym or the 
corridors of Boston University. 

To Edward Bowler, our most athletic boy, who 
has excelled in everything from football to hockey, 
and who has developed enough muscle to shame 
Charles Atlas, we leave a "yo-yo", so that he may 
always keep active and be a good sport. 

Barbara Pearson, the only promising successor 
to Mr. Roosevelt, since she has been vice-president 
for years, is our most popular girl. Since Barbara 
is everyone's best friend, and always well-supplied 



with the latest happenings, we leave her a private 
telephone so that she may give her family a little 
peace. 

To Paul Joyce, Waltham High's own Adolph 
Mcnjou, who has the very latest in men's wearing 
apparel, and who is really a flashy fellow, we be- 
queath a box of tacks to keep him as "sharp" as 
he was during '45. 

To Eleanor Tomao, our class prophet, who has 
personality plus, meaning, "She is our sunshine", 
and who has more effervescence than a bottle of 
gingerale, we leave a pair of dark glasses so every 
cne will be protected from those bright, sparkling 
eyes. 

To tall, dark, and glamorous Selma Kaufman, 
Waltham's "oomph" girl, who has a never ending 
list of admirers, we leave a sweater so that she 
may always maintain that charming appeal. 

The height of perfection is exampled by Betty 
Vilcs, our most-likely-to-succeed Secretary-treasur- 
er and D.A.R. representative. She is "lovely to 
look at", an unassuming genius, and everyone's 
darling. To our "Pilgrim", we leave the original 
ladder of success, knowing that she will reach 
that top step and be a credit to the class of '45. 

"All work and no play" never made June Kelley 
a dull girl. June's all "A" report card has proven 
that a little effort brings amazing results. She's 
our most studious girl, with a magnetic personality 
that attracts a myriad of friends. We leave June 
a bottle of shellac so that she'll keep that finished 
look. 

President Alexander Wenckus was chosen our 
most popular boy for a number of reasons. Main- 
ly, he always has a friendly greeting for every- 
one ; he's a regular fellow ; and he is respected for 
his good judgment by students and faculty. To 
Alec we leave a best seller entitled, "The Wal- 
tham Telephone Directory", which contains the 
valuable information on how to be popular with 
the opposite sex. 

To Nancy Newcomb, the class Helen Hayes, 
who has shone in such performances as "A Friend 
of the Family", and "Elmer and the Love Bug", 
we leave an Oscar which is only presented to the 
best actress of the year. 



To Jack Manning, our Clark Gable incognito, 
who donned a soldier's uniform in February and 
now is more handsome than ever, we leave some- 
thing to keep him company other than week-ends. 
Not every soldier owns a beautiful doll. 

Carolyn Noyes, the girl with the $1,000,000 
secret on how to win a young man's fancy, has 
been chosen Brightest Socialite. Carol has at- 
tended all the dances and games and is known all 
over the good ship W. H. S. as a girl with loads 
of spirit, friends, and personality. We leave her 
a flit gun just in case she ever becomes annoyed 
with any persistent pests. 

The newly elected swooner crooner of the 
bobby-sox crowd is none other than Don Kingsley. 
Don, best actor of the class of '45, can really send 
them with his solid vocal tones. This boy is 
really hep with the younger set, so we leave him 
a bottle of vitamins and a pair of shoulder pads 
so he'll always have more than his Hollywood 
rival. 

The class of 1945 does not endorse, nor is in 
no way connected with, the manufacturers of the 
aforementioned products, but any money forth- 
coming from said manufacturers for free adver- 
tising should be sent to Mr. Charles W. Goodrich, 
who promises to place it in a fund towards the 



building of a monument for Waltham High's vet- 
erans of World War II. 

We hereby nominate and appoint Mrs. Devine, 
Mr. Lees, and Mr. Mitchell as co-executors of this, 
the codicil to our last will and testament, and we 
hereby direct said executors to pay all our just 
debts and costs of administration out of our es- 
tate. We hereby request that they be exempt from 
furnishing any surety or sureties on their bonds. 

In testimony whereof we hereunto set our hand 
and publish and declare this to be the codicil to 
our last will and testament in the presence of the 

witnesses named below, this the day of 

June, A. D., 1945. 

Signed — The Class of 1945 
By — Janice Myers 

On this 6th day of June, A. D., 1945, Janice 
Myers for the class of 1945 of Waltham, Massa- 
chusetts signed the foregoing instrument in our 
presence, declaring it to be their last will; and 
thereafter as witnesses we three at their request, 
in their presence and the presence of each other, 
hereunto subscribed our names. 

James Garrahan 
Lawrence W. Elliott 
Louise G. McCullough 




' 



Class Poem 




[ 
I 
t 



SYLVIA L. GRIFF 
Writer of Class Point 

A MESSAGE TO WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL 

Dear Waltham High: 
We were immigrants on a new journey, 
When first we passed through your doors; 
It was hard to adjust ourselves to a life 
On bewildering high school shores. 

We have broken the clouds of darkness; 
We have striven to do what is right; 
We have learned what you have taught us 
With spirit, with vigor, and might. 

We shall always return to see you 
Though the years go quickly by ; 
Whether in happiness or in sadness, 
'45 will ever be nigh. 

Though this world of ours is troubled, 
Though turmoil reigns throughout, 
Because of your valued training 
We will conquer this era of doubt. 

With you as our guiding factor, 

With you as our hope supreme, 

We shall follow on in the road of success 

And fulfill our every dream. 

Sylvia L. Griff 



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JUNIOR NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Seated: Lorraine Crane, Mary Lombardo, Janet Turner. 
Standing: Richard Sherman, Frances Cronin, Alan Duplisea. 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Richard Stumpf, President; Fay Wenckus, Vice-President; Frances 

Barrow, Secretary-Treasurer; Richard Ham, Auditor. 




SOPHOMORE SOCIAL COMMITTEE 
Seated: Tony M.ingini, Chairman; Barbara Johnson, Anna Tiano, 

Nancy Wilder, Joseph Cappadona. 
Standing: Gerald Dahill, Richard Doucette, Rodney Larsson. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

Richard Doucette, Auditor; Marilyn Gowell, Vice-President; 

Howard Read, Secretary-Treasurer; Lome MacArthur, President. 



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DRAMATIC CLUB OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE 

COMMITTEE 

Seated: Elizrb:th Jackson, Nancy Newcomb, President; Marilyn 

Gowell. 
Standing: George McElhiney, Shirlie Babb, Miss Esther Mehring, 
Faculty Adviser; Barbara Bigham, Alan Duplisea. 





DRAMATIC CLUB ONE-ACT PLAYS 

Cast of "The Cocklefiefer Case" 
Standing: Alan Duplisea, James True, David Law, Bruce Butters, 

Robert Ryan, Donald Kingsley, George Gallitano. 
Seated: Corinne Robertson, Norma Read, Betty Jean Hodgdon, 

Jane Gardner, Barbara Hodgdon. 



DRAMATIC CLUB ONE-ACT PLAYS 

Cast of "A Friend of the Family" 
Standing: Richard Hosmer, Sherlie Babb, Richard Gamble, Fred 

Wills. 
Seated: Marilyn Gowell, Nancy Newcomb, Shirley Cassell. 



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DRAMATIC CLUB ONE-ACT PLAYS 

Cast of "Husbands Supplied" 
Standing: Lois Deacon, Joan Morang, Raymond Morse, Rita Lyons, 

Charlotte Leavy. 
Seated: Barbara Bigham, Carolyn Noyes, Elizabeth Jackson. 



FACULTY AND ALUMNI SERVICE PAGE 




FACULTY AND ALUMNI SERVICE PAGE IDENTIFICATIONS 



Jimmy Zografos, '4l 

Staff Sergeant, 

U. S. Army Air Corps 

63rd Air Service 

Sq. 

Miami, Florida 



George Hatfield, '44 
Seaman 1/c 
U. S. N. R. 



Clint Coolidge, '43 

Petty Officer 3/c 

U. S. Navy 

Holder of the 

Bronze Star 



George W. Porter, '40 

Coxswain 

Naval Diver, 

U. S. Navy Salvage 



Theodore Trott, '44 Lt. Edward D. May, Jr. 
U. S. Marine instructor in the 

Corps U. S. Army Air Corps 



Captain 

Thomas A. Roach 

Army of the 

United States 

Standing before the 

leaning tower of 

Pisa, Italy 



Vic Mangini, '44 

Ship's Co., Brks. 11 

U. S. N. R. B. 

Algiers, La. 



Bob Keith, '44 

Aviation Cadet 

at 

Craig Field, 

Alabama 



Bernie Nussinow, '44 

R. O. T. C. 

Harvard 

University 



Leo Gallitano, '38 

S. A. O. 3/c 

U. S. N. R. 

San Bruno, Cal. 



Miss Marion Frost 

of the Waves 

who is stationed 

in Charleston, 

South Carolina 



Robert W. Power 
Lt. (j.g.) U.S.N.R. 
South Pacific Area 




ALL-A STUDENTS — THE HIGHEST HONOR ROLL 
Standing: Amelia Cardillo, Fiances Barrow, Richard Clark, June Kelley, Isabel Harpootlian. 
Seated: Helen DeMeo, Marilyn Gowell, Arlene Simmons. 



HOW MANY SENIORS CAN YOU FIND IN THE SCHOOLDAY 



PICTURES ON THIS PAGE? 





"WHEN YOU AND I WERE YOUNG!" 





mt£mmmt 

How Times Have Changed 

Since Our '45 Graduates 

Were Kiddies ! 




BACK IN 1945, DO YOU REMEMBER 




AROUND THE CIRCUIT WITH THE CRIMSON TEAMS 



RTHLCTICS 



9 




Coach Jack JLea/y 






Silver Anniversary, 1920 - 1945 



"Beware, the Ides of March" was an old 
famous Roman saying, but to Waltham it's a red 

letter date! 

For March 15 is the day Jack Leary came back 
to Waltham High, his alma mater, to coach base- 
ball and football, the exact date being — March 
15, 1920. Yesterday marked the completion of 
25 years of coaching for the likeable Jack who is 

practically "Mr. Waltham" himself in the annals 
of Crimson football. 

Twenty-five years of coaching is a long time 
in one spot and 25 successful years it has been 
for Coach Leary who is now believed just about 
the oldest schoolboy coach (in point of service) 



in Eastern Massachusetts. Only one who probably 
can dispute his claim is Lynn Classical's Bill Joyce. 

Jack, a star halfback in the years of 1907, 1908, 
probably didn't realize or dream of the long 
successful 25 years that he has enjoyed, when he 
took over the Crimson baseball reins in the 
spring of 1920. 

Down through the years Leary has seen his boys 
come and go and he is now coaching sons of his 
former pupils. His athletes have gone far and 
wide in the athletic world after leaving Waltham 
and all have been a credit to the Leary coaching. 

Despite the success of his many great elevens 

who face a schedule "a-la-Notre Dame," meeting 




Jack, when he was captain of our 
gridiron team of 1908 



Threfall, tackle, Lcwery, quarterback; Ward, a 
back, son of Mr. Ward, now a lieutenant in the 
Navy; Fallon, a Lack; Carl Everett and Hanney, 
both backs; Hogr.n, end; Bell, center; Hal Levison, 
guard, and "Punch Howard, guard. 

That team compiled a record of eight wins, 
three losses and r.o ties, scoring 175 points as 
against 61. 

In football, prior to the '-.3 eleven, Leary likes 
to relate the feats of the 1926 eleven which tied 
Haverhill, 0-0, and late: was co-champion with 

the same school; the 1936 eleven which was co- 
champion with Maiden, and the 1928 and 1929 
teams sparked by Pendy. 

Leary also adds thai all the others were no 
"slouches" even though some didn't win cham- 
pionships as his boys al vays gave good accounts 
of themselves. 

In the 25 football teams Leary has coached, (next 
fall will be his 26th), Waltham has won something 

like 156 games; tied 29 and lost 62 while amassing 
a total of 3069 points as against the opposition's 
1395. 

With this fine record Leary sure deserves a big 
hand of congratulation on his silver anniversary 
and let's hope for Waltham's sake, he'll have 
many, many more fine years of coaching! 

Courtesy — Waltham News Tribune 



the best of them, Jack didn't get an undisputed 
champion, undefeated and untied until as late as 
1943 when his team won 11 straight to cop 
Eastern Massachusetts honors in Class A. 

With so many good things having been said 
about Jack in these long 25 years, we were pressed 
as to what to get him to say new. Finally, we did 
pin him down to name an "all-football team" of 
his 25 years of coaching, which follows: 

Le, Buzz Hogan, (Purdue) ; t, Irad Hardy, 
(Harvard) ; It, Joe Zeno, (Holy Cross) ; c Dudley 
Bell, (Harvard) ; rg, Ernie Schwotzer, (Boston 
College) ; rt, Ernie Concannon, (N.Y.U.) ; re, 
Binker Smith, (Mass. State) ; qb, Larry Lowery, 
(Holy Cross) ; nb, Bill Pendergast, (Manhattan) ; 

hb, Pat Ryan, (N.Y.U.) ; fb, Johnny Krol, (Dart- 
mouth). 

Some five or six of these players are now in the 
service as are hundreds of Leary's proteges and all 
are still carrying on in the traditional "Leary- 
Waltham" spirit. 

On his first football team in the fall of 1920, 
led by George Livermore, were such luminaries as 




JACKS 1908 TEAM 
Can you find bim? 




"John L" in a 
thoughtful mood 




"FRANKIE" COLLINS — "JACK" — "RUBE" KROL 

The Coaching Trio Which Has Brought Waltharn Many 

Gridiron Victories in the Last Few Years 




\\ ALTHAM HIGH COACHING STAFF 
Mr. Walter Brinn, Hockey 

Mr. John Leary, Football, Baseball 

Mr. Arthur Quinn, Basketball 




MR. LEARY AND MR. WARD 
This picture really needs no identification, as anyone who 
has attended Waltham High knows these two men. Mr. 
Leary and Mr. Ward engaged in one of their frequent 
friendly conversations. 



FOOTBALL 




ERNIE ZENCT 

Waltham's All-Scholastic fullback, 

superlative passer, great line plunger, 

and dependable kicker; the only 

Crimson player selected on the 

1944 Greater Boston All-Stars, 

which he captained. 



Waltham High's football team ended the 1944 
season with a record four wins, two losses, and 
two ties. This so-so record, however, does not 
show a complete picture of the team's doings. 

This year the football team was the twenty-fifth 
to be under the teaching of our great coach, Jack 
Leary. With his silver anniversary team, Jack 
had to start from scratch. Only four veterans re- 
mained from the previous years' state champs. 
However, Jack turned out a team that gave Wal- 
tham fans good cause for cheers, and also a team 
that provided plenty of thrills. 

The year's record shows wins over Rindge Tech, 
Arlington, Lynn English, and Brockton; losses to 
Maiden and Newton ; and ties with vEverett and 
Medford. Of these, the two most Heartbreaking 
games were the 13-7 loss to Maiden and the mis- 
erable 31-7 setback suffered at the hands of our 
arch-rival, Newton. These two losses were some- 
what compensated by a sweet 13-0 defeat of Lynn 
English at Manning Bowl and an encouraging 



season's end-triumph over Brockton by a 13-7 
score. Two ties, were heavily^ disappointing, 
however, for they prevented Wahrham from tak- 
ing second place in the league standings, although 
in each case our team played we'll ^enough to win. 



HIGHLIGHTS AND LOWLIGHTS OF 1944 
HIGHLIGHTS " 

1. Waltham's opening 13-0 victory over Rindge 
Tech. •• . 

1 

2. Dick Stumpf's completion of a Zeno pass in 
the Rindge Tech game for the;season's first score. 

3. Bill O'Brien's return of an intercepted pass 
in the Maiden game, from his own 12 to the 49. 

4. Bill O'Brien's C: outstanding . playing in the 
Arlington game. (Remember-his touchdown in 
this one?). ; 

5. Waltham's great showing- in the Manning 
Bowl. 




NICK PALUMBO 

Senior kicking, running, and pass 

receiving star in the Crimson's 

'44 backfield. 



6. The terrifically exciting tie with mighty Ev- 
erett (12-12). 

7. Ernie Zeno's gargantram passes in the Ev- 
erett game. 

8. Nick Palumbo's interception of a Medford 
pass behind his own goal line, to stop a Medford 
threat. 

9. Paul Oulette's touchdown in the Brockton 
game. 

10. Nick Belesis', Conrad Pensavalle's, and 
Mario Di Marzo's classy playing. Although on 
the enemy's side, these boys were really outstand- 
ing. 

11. Ernie Zeno's sterling playing in every game. 
This all-scholastic nominee certainly proved him- 
self a great ball player. 

12. The whole team's grand work in complet- 
ing a successful season. 

Lowlights 

1. Maiden's victory over Waltham, that stopped 
our own winning streak, and made possible a new 
state champion. 

2. Ernie Tivan's muff of a pass in the Maiden 



game which certainly would have provided a 
score if completed. 

3. Waltham's inability to convert a "point 
after" in the Everett game. 

4. Waltham's failure to score in the Medford 
game after fumbling several chances. 

5. Waltham's humiliating defeat at the hands 
of Newton. 

Season's Record 

Waltham Opponents 

Leominster cancelled 

Rindge Tech 13 

Maiden 13 

Arlington 14 7 

Haverhill cancelled 

Lynn English 13 7 

Everett 12 12 

Medford 

Newton 7 31 

Brockton 13 7 

Touchdowns — Zeno 3, Stumpf 3, Palumbo 2, 
Tivan 1, O'Brien 1, Oulette 1. 

Points After — Zeno 3, Bowler 2, Stumpf 1. 



BASKETBALL 



The basketball season of 1945, although not as 
successful as the previous season, provided Wal- 
tham with causes for elation as the team ended 
with a 9-7 slate. 

With only one varsity "regular" remaining 
from the Suburban League champions who won 
twelve straight in 1944, and that "regular" leav- 
ing the team at half season, the record compiled 
by our 1945 basketeers was quite encouraging. 
Besides having only one regular returning, the 
Quinnmen lost three very close decisions that 
could have stood as victories had luck played 
more on our side. 

Bill O'Brien, the only regular that returned to 
basketball, led the team until his leaving to enter 
the service at half-year. His loss was a severe 



blow as his high scoring talent and great play 
making ability were severely missed as the sea- 
son rolled on. 

However, Wally Crane, a newcomer; Carl Leaf, 
a rangy center; Roy Arbuthnot, a very valuable 
floor man; Ducky Keave, high scorer for the 
team; and substitutes — Scafide, Roy, Furdon, and 
Keyes — carried on admirably. Ducky Keane 
proved not a little surprise by leading the team 
in scoring and swishing baskets at the most op- 
portune time. Wally Crane proved another val- 
uable scorer, being second high on the team. Roy 
Arbuthnot and Carl Leaf proved steady floor men 
and accurate shots, while scrappy Scafidi, provided 
the spark when needed. 




BASKF.TBALL VARSITY 
Seated: Ducky Kc.hr. Bill O'Brien, Teddy Scafidi. 
Standing: Walter Crane, Walter Keyes, Roy Arbuthnot, Carl Leaf. 




ACTION ! 
Newton edges our courageous team 35-30 as Referee Tony Gentile calls one. 



As a whole, the team won nine games while 
dropping seven, landing in fourth place in the 
standings, and in the process racking a total of 
581 points. The only real blight on the record 
was two losses to league-champion Newton. 
Otherwise the Crimson broke at least even with 
the other teams and won three out of four non- 
league games, reaching its peak against Trade, 
when it racked up 89 points. Almost every loss, 
too, proved a close one, with several that could 
have gone either way. 

The season is behind lis; however, let's look 
again to next year's team! 

Season's Slate 



SUBURBAN LEAGUE 



Waltham 

Waltham 

Waltham 

Newton 

Rindge Tech 

Brookline 

Cambridge Latin 

Watertown 

Waltham 

Waltham 

Waltham 

Newton 

Waltham 
Waltham 
Waltham 
Somerville 



Suburban League 

42 Cambridge Latin 13 



31 Watertown 21 

43 Arlington 23 

35 Waltham 30 

41 Waltham 33 

35 Waltham 33 
33 Waltham 28 

29 Waltham 26 
37 Arlington 31 

30 Brookline 19 
29 Rindge Tech 18 
48 Waltham 34 

Non-League 

24 Maiden ■ 23 

36 Belmont 29 
89 Trade 24 
53 Waltham 32 



Newton 

Brookline 

Cambridge Latin 

Waltham 

Arlington 

Rindge Tech 

Watertown 



Won Lost 
12 



7 
7 
6 
4 
2 
2 



4 
5 
6 
7 
9 
9 



INDIVIDUAL SCORING 
G. F. 



Keane 

Crane 

Arbut-hnot 

Leaf 

O'Brien 

Scafidi 

Keyes 

Roy 

Furdon 

Booth 

Borger 

Adams 

Eliott 

Davis 

Wetherbee 

Sweeney 



44 

42 

37 

24 

24 

17 

16 

8 

9 

9 

3 

2 

1 









20 

15 

7 

16 

14 

11 

5 

15 

5 



1 













Points 

24 
14 
14 
12 

8 

4 

4 



Pts. 

108 

99 

81 

64 

62 

45 

37 

31 

23 

18 

7 

4 

2 









Totals 234 109 



581 




W. H. S. BASKETBALL JUNIOR VARSITY 
Standing: Tom Noonan, Harold Bomeogen, John Sweeny, Hob Booth, Harold 

Bowman, Jack Borger, Al Varney. 
Seated: Dick Doucette, Bob McGovem, Angelo Santa Maria, Waldemot Tilley, 

William Davis, Warren I illiot, Richard Berry. 




Bob Booth and Normie Roy, 

Two newcomers to our '45 Varsity who helped 

materially in our three late-season victories. 



HOCKEY 




First Row: Ouellette, Rier, Anderson, Bowler, Stumpf, Bell. 

Second Row: Waterhouse, Hansberry, Dugan, Chiasson, Bartlett, MacArthur, Keith, 
Smith, Ham, Coville, Haynes, Coach Walter Brinn. 



The Waltham High Hockey team did fairly 
well this year winning five and losing five to end 
up in third place behind Metropolitan Champs, 
Walpole, and Brown-trophy winner, Wellesley. 

The lack of veteran material at the outset of 
the season caused doubt in many Waltham circles 
as to how the team would weather this season's 
storm. But the Crimson, under the careful care 
of veteran Coach Walter Brinn, caused many ex- 
citing moments with their Bruin-type offense, and 
their Ranger-type back-checking defense. 

The first team consisted of Jimmy Bell, center; 
Dick Stumpf, left wing; Paul Ouelette, right 
wing; Edward Bowler, defenseman; Bob Rier, de- 
fenseman; and Francis Anderson, in the goal. 
Substitutes were Dick Ham, Don Keith, Dick 
Bartlett, Red Waterhouse, Irving Haynes, Dick 
Dugan, Warren Mead, Jack Smith, John Coville, 
Lome MacArthur, Joe Chaisson, and John Hans- 
bury. 



SEASONS RECORD 
Waltham — 2 — Framingham — — 
The Waltham second line, showing all the 
poise and balance of a well-schooled line, scored 
both goals in the lid lifter with Framingham. 
Red Waterhouse and Irving Haynes both register- 
ing tallies. 

Waltham — 1 — Norwood — 3 — 
Norwood, showing too much speed and ability, 
readily outclassed the Brinnmen. Gapt. Eddie 
Mondor paced the victors, while Paul Ouelette 
scored the lone Waltham goal. 

Waltham —2— Watertown — 0— 
Waltham got back in the win column again by 
downing Watertown 2 to 0. EH. Bowler scored 
both goals, one unassisted. 

Waltham —2— Walpole — 4— 
Potential-Champs WalpoTe scored two goals in 
the first few minutes of play, and two in the sec- 
ond period, to bring Waltham its second defeat. 
Jimmy Bell, and Dick Stumpf played well for the 
Crimson. 



Waltham —5- B. C. H. — 0— 
With goalie, Francis Anderson registering his 
third shutout of the year, Waltham played and 
won its best game to date. Only once did B. C. 
High threaten, and that with both Ed. Bowler 
and Bob Rier out, due to penalties. 

Waltham — — Needham — 3 — 
In a game marred by repeated penalties, the 
Brinn men went down to a 3 to whitewashing 
by the defending champs, Needham. A total of 
15 penalties were assessed on the two teams. 

WALTHAM —2— Wellesley — 5— 
In the roughest game of the year, Wellesley 
High, breaking a two all-tie in the third period, 
surged ahead and beat a fighting Waltham six, 

5 to 2. 

PLAYOFF GAMES 
Waltham —6 — Watertown --1- 
With all three lines scoring, Waltham downed 
a win-less Watertown aggregation to the tune of 

6 to 1. The high spot was a goal by John Hans- 
bury of the third line. 

Waltham — 3 — Framingham — 2 — 
Thanks to Dick Stumpf and Jimmy Bell on the 
line, and the expert goal tending of Francis An- 
derson, Waltham ceked out a win over a stuborn 
Framingham club, 3 to 2. 

Waltham —0— B. C. High — 5— 
The "Eaglets" literally flew all over the ice in 
downing Waltham in the final playoff game of 
the Bay State Hockey League season. By losing, 
Waltham wound up in third place with a total of 
10 points. 

HOCKEY PROSPECTS 

With an almost veteran team returning next 
year, Waltham should have a banner year in 1946. 
With only Ed. Bowler and Bob Rier leaving, it 
leaves three lines, four defensemen, and two goal- 
ies intact. It would not be at all surprising to see 
our locals retain the Bay State Crown lost in 1942. 

Let's all keep our fingers crossed and we may 



have the trophy back in the library where it be- 
longs. 





INDIVIDUAL SCORING 








Record 








Name 




-G— - 


-A— 


Pts 


Bell 




4 


6 


10 


Stumpf 




6 


2 


8 


Ouelette 




4 


1 


5 


Bowler 




3 


2 


5 


Bartlett 




3 


1 


4 


Rier 







2 


2 


Haynes 




1 


1 


2 


Hansbury 




1 





1 


Waterhouse 




1 





1 


Dugan 







1 


1 


Ham 







1 


1 


Keith 







1 


1 




Totals 


23 


18 


40 



ALL STAR SELECTIONS 
Francis Anderson was the only Waltham player 
to be selected on the first team Bay State All Stars, 
and he performed well in the net. 

Dick Stumpf, Jimmy Bell, and Ed. Bowler 
were picked on the Bay State seconds. Stumpf 
and Bell proved the value of their selection by 
either scoring or assisting on seven of the Bay 
State's eight goals. 

BASEBALL PROSPECTS 
The lack of veteran material will undoubtedly 
cause grave concern in the minds of Waltham 
fans this year. Members of the squad last year 
who will be able to play this year are Carl Leaf, 
Bob Rier, Bob Goudy, Whit Calkins, Malcolm 
Weatherbee, Huntley Tasker, George Devaux, Bill 
Furdon, Bily Davis, and Richard Bartlett. 

Norman Roy, Diddy Hart, Dick Dugan, Dick 
Ham, Donald Keith, and Lome MacArthur 
should add much strength to the Crimson nine. 




HOCKEY FIRST TEAM 

Bob Rier, Paul Ouellette, Francis Anderson, Dick Stumpf, 

Jimmie Bell, Eddie Bowler 




HOCKEY SECOND LINE 
Dick Dugan, Irving Haynes, Harry Waterhouse, Dick Bartlett 




WEARERS OF THE "W" 
1944 . 1945 



GIRLS' SPORTS 

BASKETBALL 




GIRLS' VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM, 1945 
Standing: Elsie Dorval, Isabel Harpootlian, Frances Barrow, Phyllis 

Bryson, Nancy Newcomb, Marie Dorval, Miss Louise Sewall, 

Girls' Athletic Director. 
Seated, 2nd Rote: Gilda Palumbo, Amelia Cardillo, Janet Turner, 

Lorraine Olney, Margaret Johnson. 
Seated, 1st Row: Ruth Christiansen, Mimi Aliseo, Lois Coolidge. 



FAREWELL 

We seniors must now take our leave, but we 
shall never forget the pleasant days spent in the 
gym after school for such activities as badminton, 
basketball, and volley ball; the afternoons in the 
field playing baseball or trying our luck at achiev- 
ing Robin Hood's record at archery; the Tuesday 
afternoons at the City Bowling Alleys where we 
laughingly made fun of one another, directing 
people to "follow the blue line," or admired a per- 
son with a high score. Yes, we now leave to 
make room for next year's sophomores, but we 
take with us pleasant and happy memories of 
those days. 

We admire Miss Sewall for her ability in 
coaching basketball as well as volley-ball and 
archery. She has given considerable time and 
untiring effort. She has shown great patience to- 
ward us at all times. She has taught us to be 



good sports even when things were not the way 
we wanted them. We appreciate everything she 
has done for us and will never forget her. 

Mrs. Goodwin has been a "pal" in every sense 
of the word. She also knows what it is to be pa- 
tient — she went through some trying days when 
badminton season started and newcomers didn't 
know the bird from the racket. There were many 
enjoyable days spent bowling and talking with 
Mrs. Goodwin while waiting for an alley. Yes, 
these are all a part of our memory now. 

We won't forget Miss Frost and her fine sense 
of humor. She was always teasing and fun-loving 
and also possessed that fine virtue previously men- 
tioned — patience. We were very proud of her 
when she donned the Navy blue and so happy that 
she consented to go to our Needham basketball 
game with us, and then was persuaded to attend 
our Weston game. 



Yes, these are only a small part of our memories 
of Waltham High. 

SENIOR vs. JUNIORS 

The Senior-Junior Game was no easy victory 
for the seniors although they led all the way 
through the game. It was fast, exciting, and en- 
joyed by members of both teams. Mimi Aliseo 
was high-scoring senior with 15 points, and Marie 
Dorval was high-scoring junior with 12 points to 
her credit. The score was 31-22. 

Senior line-up: G F P 

Palumbo (F) 3 6 

Aliseo (F) 7 1 15 

Kenneson (F) 

E. Dorval (F) 4 2 10 

Christiansen (G) 

Newcomb (G) 

Harpootlian (G) 

Koundakjian (G) 

Totals 14 3 31 



Junior line-up: 
Gardner (F) 
M. Dorval (F) 
Bryson (F) 
P. Johnson (G) 
Turner (G) 
Barrow (G) 



G 

2 
6 
3 



Totals 11 



F 











p 

4 
12 
6 



22 



NEEDHAM AT NEEDHAM 

The Waltham High six had a very exciting, as 
well as enjoyable, game at Needham, Thursday, 
February 1, with an honored guest in the person 
of Miss Frost, U. S. N., who was home on leave. 

The first team played a very fast and close game 
which was almost always a tie score during the 
first half. In the last half, however, Waltham 
spurted ahead with determination, winning the 
game with a score of 25-18. Captain Nancy New- 
comb's guarding ability was outstanding and had 
more than a little to do with the final score. High 
scoring forward was Jill Palumbo with 12 points. 

The second team played a hard game, and, al- 



though they were defeated, they deserve a great 
deal of praise. Every girl tried her very best so 
that by the end of the game the margin by which 
Needham won was slight to what it had been. 
Captain Elsie Dorval was high scorer with 10 
points to her credit. The final score was 21-18 in 
favor of Needham. 



First team line-up: 
Palumbo 
Aliseo 
Gardner 
M. Dorval 
Olney 
Harpootlian 
Christiansen 
Newcomb 



Second team line-up: 
Cardillo 
Coolidge 
E. Dorval 
Bryson 
P. Johnson 
Barrow 
Poretta 
Turner 



G 

6 
4 
1 
1 




Totals 12 



G 

1 


4 
3 




8 



Totals 



F 




1 






1 

F 



2 





2 



P 

12 
8 
2 
3 





25 

P 

2 


10 
6 





18 



WESTON AT WALTHAM 

Waltham's first team was defeated for the first 
time in three years by the Weston lassies, who 
won a hard fought game February 6 with a score 
of 17-15. The cheering section included many 
prominent members of the hockey squad. 

Ruth Christiansen did an excellent job of 
guarding, which is not unusual. Jill Palumbo cer- 
tainly did well, and, believe me, she had a prob- 
lem. Her guard was one whom she tried very 
hard to evade throughout the game and often suc- 
ceeded, but just ask Jill about the few times when 
she didn't quite succeed. Mimi Aliseo was high 
scorer with 8 points. 

The second team made up for the first team's 
loss by scoring a decisive victory over Weston's 
second team, with Millie Cardillo as high scorer. 




SENIOR GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 
Standing: Gilda Palumbo, Ruth Christiansen, Nancy Newcomb, Mimi Aliseo, 

Isabel Harpootlian. 
Seated: Laura Kenneson, Captain Elsie Dorval, Adela Koundakjian. 




JUNIOR GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 

Standing: Frances Barrow, Millie Cardillo, Lorraine Olney, Marie Dorval, 

Peggy Johnson, Janet Turner. 
Kneeling: Marjorie Gardner. 




SOPHOMORE GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 
Captain Lois Coolidge holding the ball. 

Standing: Ann French, Barbara Johnson, Mary Koutoujian, Ann Kounoakjian, 
Georgia Landry. 



The Waltham girls chalked up point after point 
while the efficient guards prevented the Westerners 
from getting many. The final score was 23-7. 



First team line-up: 
Aliseo 
Gardner 
Palumbo 
M. Dorval 
Newcomb 
Olney 

Christiansen 
Harpootlian 



Second team line-up: 
Cardillo 
E. Dorval 
Coolidge 
Bryson 
P. Johnson 
Barrow 
Poretta 
Turner 



Totals 



G 

2 

2 





4 



G 

4 
2 
1 
4 




Totals 11 



F 

4 

2 
1 




7 

F 

1 















1 



p 

8 

6 
1 




15 

P 

9 
4 
2 
8 




23 



CAMBRIDGE LATIN AT WALTHAM 
Cambridge Latin Junior and Sophomore Girls' 
Basketball Teams both won decisive victories over 
the Waltham Higli juniors and sophomores Thurs- 
day, March 8, at the Waltham High gym. Both 
games were very fast. Cambridge Latin sopho- 
mores won 50-10; juniors won 39-27. 

Waltham Sophomore line-up: 
Koutoujian (F) 
French (F) 
Coolidge (F) 
B. Johnson (G) 
Koundakjian (G) 
Landry (G) 

Totals 
Waltham Junior line-up: 
Cardillo (F) 
Bryson (F) 
Gardner (F) 
Dorval (F) 
Johnson (G) 
Barrow (G) 
Turner (G) 
Olney (G) 

Totals 



G 


F 


P 


3 





6 


1 





2 


1 





2 





























5 





10 


G 


F 


P 











1 





2 


6 


2 


14 


5 


1 


11 






































.2 


3 


27 



VOLLEY BALL 

The annual volley ball game between women 
teachers and students was held Wednesday, March 
14. It was exciting all the time although the stu- 
dents were always ahead. The score was 41-29. 

We welcome the newcomers on the Faculty 
Team and wish to show our appreciation to the 
team as a whole for their good sportsmanship. 
While the score may indicate ability, we must 
bear in mind that the teachers had not practiced 
for some time. 

Participants were: 

FACULTY 
Miss E. Mehring 
Miss A. Mehring 
Miss Sewell 
Mrs. Goodwin 
Mrs. Minch 
Miss Tribou 
Miss Hyde 
Miss Johnson 
Miss Stewart 

STUDENTS 
M. Dorval 



A. Cardillo 
A. Koundakjian 
F. Barrow 
L. Hawley 
V. Oliveri 
P. Bryson 
L. Kenneson 
E. Deveaux 
J. Home 
L. Olney 
J. Turner 
Isabel Harpootlian, '45 



JUNIORS vs. SOPHOMORES 
The juniors scored a decisive victory over the 
sophomores in the game played February 15. 

Margie Gardner and Marie Dorval seemed to 
live under the basket, and Phyllis Bryson sent 
some beautiful long shots into the basket. Lois 
Coolidge was the outstanding sophomore, who 
surprised herself with some very unexpected bas- 
kets 



Sophomores 
Koutoujian 
Coolidge 
French 
Poretta 
Erwin 

Koundakjian 
Landry 



G 


F 


P 


2 





4 


3 


1 


7 


1 





2 






































6 


1 


13 



Totals 
Isabel Harpootlian, '45 



ARMY vs. NAVY 

December 7, 1944, the third anniversary of that 
day we all remember so well, marked a successful 
close to the fall volley-ball season. On this day 
two teams were organized by Miss Sewall. Both 
teams voted unanimously for their temporary titles 
of "Army" and "Navy" without even consider- 
ing how appropriately it suited the day. Miss 
Sewall was our very efficient referee and scorer. 

Excellent teamwork and sportsmanship was dis- 
played by both teams. Mary Koutoujian of Navy 
and Joan Carville of Army seemed to be in com- 
petition to see which of the two could sock the ball 
the harder. They both did a grand job and gave 
a preview of the 1947 senior volley ball team. 

Elsie Dorval and Millie Cardillo did beautifully 
at front-line playing, and Laura Kenneson's crack 
serving chalked up quite a few points for Army. 
Marjie Gardner proved that ptactice is practice, 
but a game is a game, but definitely! That girl 
has talent. Who is the girl that sends the ball 
sailing smoothly above the rafters only to land out 
of bounds ? No, Elsie, it couldn't be you ! 

The teams were composed of the following: 













ARMY 


NAVY 


The final score 


was 44-13. 








Laura Kenneson 


Jean Erwin 


Juniors 




G 


F 


p 


Elsie Dorval 


Georgette Landry 


M. Dorval 




10 





20 


Isabel Harpootlian Mary Koutoujian 


Cardillo 




1 





2 


Marjorie Gardner 


Isabelle MacKenzie 


Gardner 




7 





14 


Helen Demeo 


Marie Dorval 


Bryson 




4 





8 


Joan Carville 


Sherlie Babb 


P. Johnson 













Audrey Ware 


Amelia Cardillo 


Turner 













The final score 


of the game was 65-27 in favor 


Barrow 













of Army. After 


Army played such a good game 


Olney 













of football, we couldn't let them down, could we ? 




Totals 


22 





44 




Isabel Harpootlian, '45 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

The Mirror wishes to thank all its staff mem- 
bers for their grand cooperation and hard work, 
which have made possible two outstanding issues 
this year. 

Heartiest thanks go to the Business Staff, upon 
whose shoulders depends the financial success of 
the Mirror. The zeal of the staff has helped tre- 
mendously to make the magazine the most success- 
ful in recent years. A special vote of appreciation 
goes to Alexander Wenckus for his untiring devo- 
tion and his organizing ability which have made 
the Business Staff such a success. 

Harold Whitney, David Law, and Hector Mac- 
Lean, our class photographers, deserve high praise 
for their fine work in supplying the Mirror with 
photographs of our teams in action as well as 
other important class activities. 

The Literary Staff this year has been most co- 
operative. Gathering material for publication and 
handling "write-ups" are arduous tasks, but the 
grand cooperation of the staff eliminated much 
confusion and lost time. 

To the Art Staff, whose work this year ranks 
with the best, we give a bouquet of thanks. Little 
do students realize the huge amount of work 
which this staff does, and how much the popularity 
of the Mirror depends on this work. Barden 
Wellcome, Barbara French, James Davini, and the 
rest of the staff deserve loads of praise. 

We duly acknowledge once again the courtesy 
of the Waltham News Tribune for providing us 
with football pictures and other essentials so neces- 
sary to the photographic success of any good year- 
book. 

To the Mirror Room Agents we give thanks for 
their untiring devotion to the sale of the magazine. 
Because of their splendid efforts, the sale of the 
Mirror has been a decided success. Here are their 
names and room numbers: 

013 Gertrude Bohannon 
015 Joanne Flannery 
017 Howard Read 
102 Laura Kenneson 

105 Elaine Ramsdell 

106 William Davisson 

107 Helen DeMeo 



109 Howard Bettinson 

111 Theresa Hayes 

112 Mimmi Aliseo 

113 Josephine DiRampio 

114 Edward Bowler 

115 Helene Borger 

117 Clark Campbell 

118 Pauline Cormier 
201 Janet Turner 

203 Raymond Yarmartino 

204 June Bauer 

205 Gerald Richardson 

206 Miriam Nssinow 

207 Warren Meade 
211 Joan Morang 

213 Clara Nicholson 

214 Barbara Dunn 

215 Robert Adler 

216 Louis LeBlanc 

217 Every Olsen 

218 Gerald Dearborn 
307 Barbara Bigham 
406 Harriet Cunniffe 

Finally, we are sincerely grateful to the faculty 
advisers, Miss Victs, Mr. Hood, Mrs. Devine, and 
Miss Russo, and to our office staff as well, for 
their constant aid and advice. 



We, the class of 1945, shall be remembered as 
the last one to have the services of Mr. Ward, our 
beloved submaster. For forty-one years, Waltham 
High has had the honor of having Mr. Ward on 
its staff, and for many years as a class advisor. 

Those of us who have had him as a teacher re- 
gret the loss that Waltham High must suffer. We 
know of Mr. Ward's greatness. It is difficult to 
describe adequately the feeling of respect that he 
commands in his classroom, or to explain the in- 
spiration he has been to all his students. His 
pupils have held him in highest esteem, and they 
will never forget the great work he accomplished 
for their benefit. 

Your leaving, Mr. Ward, is a loss that can 
never be replaced. English classes will lack those 
personal "Mr. Ward" touches that have made 
your classes :o outstanding. 



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7 to 8:30 P. M. 









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i WALtham 4582 
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WATCH CITY 
ELECTRIC CO. 



Everything Electrical 



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457 MOODY STREET 



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Perfect Diamonds — Watches 
Jewelry 

Cash or Budget 

1 

WESTON'S UPSTAIRS I 

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JEWELRY STORE • 

Second Floor 
353 MOODY STREET 



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Looking Ahead? ? 

AMERICAN 

EMPLOYMENT 

EXCHANGE 

EXCELLENT POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE FOR BEGINNERS 

SECRETARIES, TYPISTS, 

BOOKKEEPERS, AND CLERKS 

127 FEDERAL STREET 

BOSTON 

Liberty 2970 



Compliments of . . . 



W. H. NICHOLS 



& 



SONS 



Like to help a Doctor? 



A Medical Secretary Has an Important 
Role in an Interesting Profession 

Memberi of the medical profession and 
others require secretaries who have had 
specialized training. Often the secretary 
without special training cannot handle 
dudes peculiar to a professional office. 

The Fisher School has prepared hun- 
dreds of young women for the exacting 
needs of professions and modern business. 
2-year Medical, Legal, Foreign Trade, 
Radio Secretarial. Also 2-year Executive 
Secretarial, 1-year Stenographic and Fin- 
ishing Secretarial. Successful placement. 
Dormitory. 

Send for illustrated catalog— and learn 
how 7 typical Fisher girls found their 



careers. 



fislm SCHOOL 




1 18 Beacon Street, Boston 16, Mass. 
374 Broadway, Winter Hill 45, Mass. 



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j Waltham 

Wall Paper 8C Paint Co. 



Established 1905 



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B. C. AMES CO. 



591 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM 



MASSACHUSETTS 



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WALTHAM 



MASSACHUSETTS 



The American Superior 
Shoe Rebuilding Co. 

Ed. J. Prove ncher, Prop. 



NEWALL CO. 



True To Its Name 



107 MOODY STREET 



Reliable To The Minute 



WALTHAM 



MASSACHUSETTS 



705 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



Telephone WALtham 1824 



L. 



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WALTHAM 



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V. A. RICHARDSON 



FURNITURE CO. 



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Druggist 



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WALTHAM FEDERAL SAVINGS 



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716 MAIN STREET 



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MASSACHUSETTS 












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ANDERSON'S 



Nest-to- You Poultry 



HOME BAKERY 



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370 Moody Street 






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Machinists 

39 FARNSWORTH STREET 



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Groceries 



Corner Bacon and School Streets 



Waltham 4994 



Waltham 1894 



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HAYS FUEL 
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100 FRANCIS STREET 
Waltham 2100 



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ARMAND STUDIO 



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FREEDOM 
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Waltham 3700-3701 



W AVERLEY OAKS ROAD 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



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W. T. GRANT 



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Attv. and Mrs. 



305 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



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! THE EMILY ROSE 



SHOPPE 



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393 MOODY STREET 



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"Where You Get the Best 



Values" 



Coats, Suits, Dresses, Skirts 



and Blouses 



CUNNINGHAM 
RADIO SERVICE 



Expert Radio Repairing ! 



688 MAIN STREET 



Waltham 4568 




VuJwhiliiy 



1003^ EOUIPMENT 

ADMIRAL BYRD 
SOUTH POLE EXPEDITION 



PERRINE 

QUALITY PRODUCTS 

CORPORATION 



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Established 
1872 



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1295 MAIN STREET 

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JEAN'S 



LUNCHEONETTE 



"Waltbam's Oldest — 

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EASTERN COAT MANUFACTURING CO. 



Watertown, Massachusetts 



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MENDELSOHNS, 



Incorporated 



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ELLISON PARK 

MARKET 
"The Best in Food" 



470 MAIN STREET 
Waltham 3080 



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Moody and Spruce Streets 
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•'The Friendly 

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ANDERSON 

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ALWAYS HIGH GRADE 

NEVER 

HIGH PRICED 



196 MOODY STREET 



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MASSACHUSETTS 



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PERNA'S 



BEAUTY SALON 



Mary Plrna, Manager 



WALTHAM 



Te. WALham 4513 



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WALTHAM COAL ' 



Established 1872 



COMPANY 



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! B.F. Goodrich Company > 



RETAIL DIVISION 



705 Main Street 



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1 Headquarters for 

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Bernard E. Mullin 



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GEORGE J. BARKER 



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LEW'S 



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A. T. BALL 



HOORPC RATED 



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609 Main Street 



TO THE 



C:::=::e Cry BaD 



The Year Round Toy Shop 



Headquarters for 



Graduating Class 



FROM THE 



_ , , . ~ „ , , III A College Division I 

\ lcror - Columbia - Decca Records. - i 



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MAIN STREET 
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Starting j 



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Waltham 3900 \ 

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COMPANY. INC. 



"Where You Buy With 
Confidence" 



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Paints - Oils - Varnishes 



133 MOODY STREET 



H. I. JOHNSON 

Drugs 



Waltham 0893 



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Insurance 
Real Estate 



682 MAIN STREET 
WALTHAM, MASS. 






BRENTON E. TYLER ! 



THOMAS J. JOYCE j 



REAL ESTATE 



135 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM 

Telephone WALtham 2815 



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Tel. WALtham 1985-M 



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53 PROSPECT STREET 
WALTHAM 



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PATTI BROS., INC. j 



ROY JOHNSTONS 
TIRE SHOP 



KRAFT SYSTEM RECAPPING 



876 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



VULCANIZING 



BATTERIES 



929 Main Street 



Waltham 4975 



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WALTHAM 



ELECTRIC SHOP 



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APPLIANCE REPAIRING 

RADIO 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING 

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! PHILIP E. BURKE 

113 CRESCENT STREET 

WALTHAM, MASS. 
Telephone WALtham 1900 

FURNITURE MOVING 
and STORAGE 



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WASHINGTON JEWELRY 



COMPANY 



INTERSTATE SERVICE 



CRATING — SHIPPING 



FIREPROOF WAREHOUSE 



312 Moody Street 
Waltham 



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S. L. LOMBARDI 



Nome's Cake Kitchen 



Roofing and Sidewalks 
A Specialty 



17 YETTEN TERRACE 



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Waltham 



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A FRIEND 



Marcel 
Finger and 
Water Waving 
Hair Cutting 



Facials 

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The Gertrude 
Beauty Shoppe 

Gertrude M. Nichols 

SPECIALIZES IN COLD WAVES 

52 MAPLE STREET 

Near Adams Street 

WALTHAM, MASS. 



Telephone Waltham 2926 



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mmtmi- 



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^ First watch using standardized, interchangeable 
parts and all made under one roof. 

fa First watch company to make the smallest round 
ladies' watch in America. 

^ First really thin American pocket watch. 

-fa First in America with the smallest rectangular 
ladies' watch. 

^ First railroad watch in the world built to railroad 
specifications. 

^ Tomorrow, there will be new Waltham "firsts" . . . 
smartly styled . . . wonderfully precision-made. 




WALTHA 



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WALTHAM WATCH COMPANY, WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 






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